MIGHTY CULTURE

5 things NOT to do when you arrive at your first infantry unit

There comes a time in every Marine's life when they must join the varsity team known as The Fleet. The first few weeks are an exciting time of formations, picking up cigarette buds, and hazing training. The fleet is a Machiavellian jungle of NJPs, promotions, and broken promises that will make you want to deploy at a moment's notice.

A healthy dose of pessimism is key to survival in your first unit because you're not in a movie; this is a war machine, and you're an essential cog. You're where the metal meets the meat. Keep that motivation, though, you're going to need it.

Here's what you should not do when you arrive at your first infantry unit.


1. Boot camp stories are a no-go

The easiest way to annoy everyone around you is to make jokes using a drill instructor's voice. Do not assume that it will inspire some sense of brotherhood because all Marines go to boot camp. Wrong. Everyone has their own stories, and they will let you know how much easier you had it. The more experienced Marines have been in some serious combat, and, by comparison, you're just a baby.

No one likes a B.O.O.T. (barely out of training) Marine, and you're just going to have to accept that. It's part of the culture; it's part of maturing into a warfighter, it's what you signed up for. When you're alone with your peers, it's fine to talk about what you went through, but knowing your audience will save you an untold amount of stress in an already stressful work environment.

Guess who has duty on New Years?

(Terminal Lance)

2. Don't dress like a boot

Marines are proud — it's on the recruitment poster — that doesn't mean you should exclusively buy Eagle, Globe, and Anchor t-shirts. Diversify your wardrobe because it's one of the few things that will allow you to hold onto what some psychologists describe as a "personality."

Don't say I didn't warn you, brother.

(Terminal Lance)

3. Fix the problem yourself, don't tattle 

Everyone around you can potentiality be in combat with you, and it's a lot easier to risk life and limb for someone you like. If the man to your left or your right is doing something wrong, fix them, but do not ever snitch. You will be ostracized, given the worst assignments, and when they're done with your disloyal carcass, you'll be pushing papers at headquarters. HQ will also know that you're a stool pigeon and will continue to treat you accordingly. The stigma has been known to last for years, Marine. One of the Infantry's cardinal rules is to re-calibrate a misguided Marine's moral compass through intense physical training but do not ruin their career.

It's called taking care of your own.

You did what!?

(Terminal Lance)

4. Do not get in trouble before your first deployment

Keep your nose just as clean as your inspection uniforms. Every three years, an enlisted Marine will receive a Good Conduct Medal to add to their stack. While it is not necessarily easy to obtain due to barracks parties or dares gone wrong, it is not so taxing that it's insurmountable. Getting in trouble will hold you back from promotions in a highly competitive MOS. If you don't want to call that window-licking-moron that came with you from the school of infantry corporal, do not get drunk and embarrass yourself.

It's free real estate

5. Do not put off doing your MCIs

The Marine Corps Institute is a self-learning platform that adds points to the Marine promotion system known as a cutting score. It offers courses that teach about combat procedures and tactical knowledge of weapon systems. Some are easier than others, and there's no reason for a fresh Marine to not do them. It will set you apart from your peers in the eyes of the leadership, and it makes the platoon look better on paper.

Every quarter, battalion HQ evaluates the progress each line company is making towards promoting their Marines. A Marine working on his or her MCIs will be spared working parties by their seniors because it is in their best interest as well. Although junior Marines will not witness Staff NCOs and officers brag or trash talk about each other's platoons, this is another point they can bring up in Command and Staff meetings stating that their platoon should have the honor of leading the assault in training and in combat.

And he did all of his MCIs!

(Terminal Lance)