The Air Force is changing.

Air Force senior leaders are aware of the need to not only adapt, but retain the service's competitive edge over our enemies.

"All of us have to come together to understand the threat and be clear-eyed on the competition that we face," said Air Force Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Stephen Wilson. "A changing world environment, strategic competition and peer competitors are the catalysts that make this change so immediately important."


Part of this change is the emphasis on Joint All Domain Command and Control, or JADC2, the internet of the joint warfighter that connects all platforms and people and accelerates the speed of data-sharing and decision-making in all five domains: land, air, sea, cyber and space.

Secretary of the Air Force Barbara Barrett says JADC2, "more seamlessly integrates the joint team in a battle network that links all sensors to all shooters."

Secretary of the Air Force Barbara Barrett delivers remarks during the Air Force Association's Air Warfare Symposium, in Orlando, Fla., Feb. 27, 2020. The three-day event is a professional development forum that offers the opportunity for Department of Defense personnel to participate in forums, speeches, seminars and workshops with defense industry professionals.

U.S. Air Force // Wayne Clark

With the creation of the U.S. Space Force, the Air Force is showing intent to dominate space, allocating $15.4 billion from the $169 billion budget proposal to ensure superiority in space, provide deterrence and, if deterrence fails, provide combat power.

"Space is essential in today's American way of life," Barrett said. "Navigation, communication, information all depend on these aging, vulnerable, though brilliant, GPS satellites."

The Air Force has already begun replacing these older satellites with new, defendable GPS satellites.

With the budget proposal comes a continued effort to increase the number of squadrons in the Air Force to 386, ensuring the ability to generate combat power and improve readiness.

"This budget moves us forward to recapitalize our two legs of the [nuclear] triad and the critical nuclear command and control that ties it all together," said Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein.

Gwynne Shotwell (center), SpaceX Chief Operating Officer, briefs Gen. Stephen W. Wilson, Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force (left) and David Norquist, Deputy Secretary of Defense, on SpaceX capabilities during the Advanced Battle Management System (ABMS) demonstration at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., Dec. 18, 2019. During this week's first demonstration of the ABMS, operators across the Air Force, Army, Navy and industry tested multiple real time data sharing tools and technology in a homeland defense-based scenario enacted by U.S. Northern Command and enabled by Air Force senior leaders. The collection of networked systems and immediately available information is critical to enabling joint service operations across all domains.

U.S. Air Force // Tech. SGT. Joshua J. Garcia

During her speech at the Air Force Association's Air Warfare Symposium in February, Barrett stated, "Our priorities can be summed up simply. We need a modern, smart, connected, strong Air and Space Force to deter and defend against aggression and preserve precious freedom and peace."

The Air Force is changing, but as Wilson puts it, "The threat has changed; now we're looking through a lens that is an existential change, and an existential threat out there."

This article originally appeared on Airman Magazine. Follow @AirmanMagazine on Twitter.