(U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael R. Holzworth)

The old saying, "women love a man in uniform" comes with a long list of exceptions. For example, the expression does not apply to service members wearing a pair of S9 GI glasses — more commonly known as "birth control glasses," or BCGs. Even the updated 5A GI glasses are only just a slight improvement in style over their infamous predecessor.

The distaste held by many troops wearing them isn't without merit. You're asking big, badass troops to don a pair of prescription glasses that immediately makes them look like the biggest dorks on the face of the planet. But if you can get over the fact that you're often going to be mistaken for the commo guy, you'll see there's a very valid reason why the military has issued them out for all these years.

And it's related to one of their other nicknames: up-armored glasses.


The very first version of GI glasses were issued out back in WWII. The P3 lenses they used were originally meant to be inserts for gas masks — but your average, visually impaired troop needed to see clearly, so the military started issuing out their own version of prescription glasses.

After the war, they switched the frames from a nickel alloy to cellulose acetate. Recipients could choose between gray and black frames. The glasses weren't too out of the ordinary style-wise and they served a dual purpose of acting as thicker-than-average eye protection while improving a troop's sight.

For the time, the glasses were aligned with fashion trends and, frankly, style wasn't much of a concern — they were free, they worked, and they were definitely within military regulations. It was just a bonus that they didn't look too bad, either.

This soldier's look has been appropriated by hipster douchebags who raise hell if their organic kale smoothie wasn't free-range.

(Tennessee State Library and Archives)

Then, the late 70s rolled around and the military went all in on the S9 GI glasses. The frames were bulky and only available in "librarian brown" cellulose acetate. Around this time, soft corrective contact lenses became more prevalent, but military regulation forbid contacts, so if you had a visual impairment, you were forced to look like a dork.

The restriction on contacts isn't without merit. As anyone who's ever worn contacts can tell you, they're a pain in the ass to maintain everyday and almost impossible to keep up with in a military environment. A single speck of dirt can potentially irritate your eye and take you out of the fight. The S9s on the other hand, were intended to withstand the austere environments troops deploy to and the lenses and frame are durable.

They can do anything but help you talk to the ladies.

(Photo by Sam Giltner)

The military has adapted to societal trends over the years to keep troops seeing properly and protecting their eyes. Wearing BCGs is a regulation that's really only enforced during recruit training or Officer Candidate School. After the bespectacled troop gets to their first unit, they can swap them out for a pair of civilian, prescription glasses — so long as they don't have any brand logos on the sides.

The modern version of the GI Glasses — the Model 5A — were released in 2012 to replace the awkward S9s. They offer the same protection, are still free, and they come in a variety of style options from which the troop can choose.

All of the jokes we throw at each other for looking dorky as hell will soon be a thing of the past. Now we'll need some other trait to poke fun at...

(Photo by Melissa K. Buckley, Ft. Leonard Wood)