The Vanscoyk family in Yuma, Arizona. All photos by Kayla Mattox Photography.

Family first, mission always.

Marine Gunnery Sgt. Charles Vanscoyk and his wife, Staff Sgt. Alexandra Vanscoyk, are both aviation supply specialists who recently returned to the fleet after completing tours on recruiting duty. The transition has been met with unexpected challenges that magnify the logistics needed for couples seeking successful careers and a growing family.


The Vanscoyks met in 2013 shortly after Alexandra left college and enlisted in the Marine Corps. She says the two quickly became friends, deciding to date after being stationed at Camp Pendleton, California, together.

"For three years our lives crossed paths on and off and eventually timing lined up where we were both single and we decide to try dating each other," she explained in an email.

Alexandra said it came natural to date someone who understood the military lifestyle.

"It was always difficult finding civilians who wanted to date a 'female Marine.' I'm not really sure why. My best guess is our job title is intimidating to most civilians and we usually have an alpha personality which can also come off as intimidating. It also made conversations easier. We use so many acronyms and random jargon that most people will never understand, no matter how many times you tell them. So, for me, dating a Marine was what seemed realistic," she said.

Missouri-native Charles Vanscoyk followed his twin brother into the Marines in 2004 after a short stint at college proved school wasn't for him. Charles says a conversation with the recruiter made him realize the military was what he had been looking for.

"Growing up I was an athlete and liked to be challenged and stay competitive. Plus coming from a small town in the middle of nowhere the idea of travel and adventure sounded cool," he said.

Both Marines were attached to Recruiting Station Houston, completing the independent duty assignment then relocating to Marine Corps Air Station Yuma in Arizona. They both admit it's been an adjustment to not only be back in the fleet, but doing so with the added stress of the current COVID-19 pandemic.

Under normal circumstances, childcare is a trending issue for households with working parents. Alexandra says a good command definitely makes it easier for them.

"Since we are both active duty it's very difficult to come up with a solid routine while the daycares are closed. We've got two kids at home — one school aged who needs to complete online class work and an infant who needs constant attention. Thankfully our command has been very helpful but I know other dual couples who have not been as fortunate," she said.

Prior to the pandemic, she adds, some of the challenges "were deciding who would stay home if the kids got sick, who would take time off work for appointments, worrying about when you or your spouse has 24–hour duty," though she is quick to point out their family has benefitted from "very understanding units and leadership." And the exposure to solid leadership over the years has guided her throughout her career.

"The commanding officer at my first unit had a moto: "family first, mission always." At the time I didn't have a family but it stuck with me. At my second unit I had two different COs and both were huge family men. Seeing them, 15 years plus into their career and still having a strong family made me realize it is possible to have the best of both," she said.

Alexandra adds that her advice for younger service members is to find a good balance for work-home life, especially if you're in a dual military relationship. Charles echoes that sentiment.

"The best advice I could give is put your family first. Still be a good Marine and proficient at your job, but understand this machine that is the Marine Corps will not fall apart if you are not there. Be there for you kids and family. Don't miss those moments you will never get back with your family," he said.

The Vanscoyks have their sights set on serving in the Marines for the long haul, with Alexandra weighing the idea of either pursuing warrant officer school or becoming a career recruiter. Charles says he has checked the box on many of his goals making career progression the natural focus.

"As a Marine you always strive for the next rank, so MSgt is my goal. And continue to try and motivate and inspire these next generation of Marines that will carry on the legacy," he said.

This article originally appeared on Military Families Magazine. Follow @MilFamiliesMag on Twitter.