(Staff Sgt. Andrew Smith / U.S. Army)

By far, the most coveted and "forgotten to return" item that's ever been issued to members of the military is the woobie. Maybe you've forgotten that your most cherished bit of military memorabilia is actually a poncho liner ... since so few people ever actually used it for its intended purpose. The woobie designers intended for you to use the little holes on the sides to tie it together, but let's be serious – no one has ever done that. It's probably a really excellent poncho liner, but chances are you're never going to use it for its manufactured purpose. Instead, let's take a look at some great ways to use your woobie besides using it as a blanket.


History of the woobie

But first, do you even know why it's called a woobie? The real origin story is likely lost to history, but most people tend to think it's because of the phrase, "Because you would be cold without it." "Would be" eventually evolved into woobie, and a military star was born.

The truth is that the woobie history stretches back even further to the 1850s when ponchos were first in use by the American military. Forces assigned to patrol the Western Plains were issued ponchos to keep them warm. These ponchos were made from "gutta-percha muslin," which was muslin fabric coated with rubber. The rubber coating made the poncho waterproof but also made it hard to fold.

During the Civil War, these rubber coated ponchos were standard issue. Ponchos were used as both waterproof groundsheets and to keep dry.

By 1900, ponchos were made from rubberized canvas, which was great for weatherproofing, but really freaking heavy.

During WWI and WWII, service members used ponchos because they could protect both the pack and the wearer as well as serving as a makeshift shelter in the field.

The 1950s saw ponchos made from synthetic fabrics, and this is when the earliest predecessor of what we know as the woobie began to emerge. During the Vietnam War, the standard-issue Army wool blanket was unsuited for the terrain and climate, since it got really heavy when wet. The woobie made its first field appearance sometime between 1962 and 1964.

Okay, enough history. Here are three fun things you can do with your woobie.

1. Repurpose as a robe

Find a seamstress and make your woobie into the coziest robe ever. Trust us when we say you'll never want to take it off. If you're not the robe-wearing type, what about making it into the warmest hoodie ever? Or you could go all out and have it repurposed into a light jacket, thereby getting pretty darn close to the woobie's intended original use.

2. Camp

Use it as a tent divider if you're still keen on camping. That is if being in the field wasn't enough camping to last a lifetime. Woobies make perfect tent dividers to section out space inside a large tent or to create rooms if you're camping with your family.

3. Pets

Let your cat or dog appropriate it and use it as their new favorite bed. It smells like you, it's soft, warm, and it makes for the perfect traveling pet bed because it's so compact. It's especially useful for the inside of kennels if you have to move since the woobie is waterproof and dustproof.

A few years back, the Marine Corps unveiled the Woobie 2.0, and four years on, we're still smiling about its enhanced benefits. This upgrade includes the things service members have been asking for – better insulation, a way to keep various tie-down points in place, and the addition of parachute cord loops. The latest version also includes a heavy-duty reversible zipper to make the woobie into the ultimate cozy cocoon. Woobie 2.0 doesn't have as much stitching as the older version because the insulation is so much better. But to prevent rips, some stitches run down the length of the woobie.

We're obsessed with the new zipper function and like all the old times always said, these new kids don't know how good they've got it. From its humble beginnings in the earliest days of the American military to the jungles of Vietnam, the woobie truly is the greatest military invention ever fielded.