(US Air Force photo by Tech Sgt. Christopher Carranza)

US 'Hurricane Hunter' aircraft have been flying in and out of Hurricane Dorian, capturing wild photos of a storm that devastated the Bahamas and appears to be heading toward the US.

Dorian, one of the most powerful Atlantic storms in history, has been downgraded from a Category 5 storm to a Category 2, as winds have decreased to around 110 mph from their earlier 185 mph, but this hurricane remains a cause for concern.


US reconnaissance and weather monitoring aircraft with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have been making regular flights through Dorian, providing vital information about the hurricane.

The U.S. Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunters fly in the eye of Hurricane Dorian, Aug. 31, 2019.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Diana Cossaboom)

NOAA's hurricane hunting missions are supported by two WP-3D Orions, as well as Air Force WC-130J aircraft. NOAA has several other aircraft capable of providing assistance, but there are only a handful of planes that can handle flying into the storm.

The 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron, an Air Force Reserve unit located at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi., gathered weather information during a mission into Hurricane Dorian Sep. 2, 2019.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Christopher Carranza)

The crews make multiple passes through the storm, with the tough missions often lasting hours. They gather important information on the storm's speed, direction, and wind patterns.

The 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron, an Air Force Reserve unit located at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi., gathered weather information during a mission into Hurricane Dorian Sep. 2, 2019.

(U.S. Air Force photo by U.S. Navy Midshipman First Class Julia Von Fecht)

A team of "Hurricane Hunters" with the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron with the 403rd Reserve Wing recently captured some wild photos from inside Dorian, including some of a lighting storm.

The 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron shared this photo from a mission on Sept. 1, 2019.

(U.S. Air Force photo)

Here's another shot of the lightning storm.

"We've made it back home to Keesler Air Force Base," the squadron tweeted on Sept. 1, 2019.

(U.S. Air Force photo)

Crew members who participated in some of the recent flights have also posted some shocking images and videos of Dorian. The "stadium effect," something that occurs with particularly strong hurricanes, can be seen clearly in this photo from one "Hurricane Hunter."

This image shows the "stadium effect" seen from the eye of the hurricane.

(Ian Sears/NOAA)

While Hurricane Dorian is not as strong as it was, it is still considered a very dangerous storm. The National Hurricane Center, a division of NOAA, sent out a notification Sep. 3, 2019, explaining that the storm may actually be getting worse given its growing size.

This image shows another view of the "stadium effect" seen inside Hurricane Dorian.

(Ian Sears/NOAA)

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.