Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY CULTURE
Joshua Skovlund

Meet the LAPD detective who specialized in hunting cop killers

As a rookie with the Los Angeles Police Department, Charles Bennett was sitting in his squad car with his white partner when the senior officer turned to Bennett and said, "You're not black, I'm not white — we're blue. And trust me; if something ever happens to you at 3 o'clock in the morning, they're going to call guys, and they're not going to care what color or nationality you are. They're going to roll out here and solve the problem and win. We're going to find out whoever hurt you, and we're going to arrest them and do what we have to do."


Those words resonated with Bennett 10 years later when he found himself answering the call to bring justice after a fellow officer's death.

charles bennettCharles Bennett retired in 2010 after serving 33 years on the LAPD. Photo courtesy of Charles Bennett.

Bennett started with the LAPD in 1977 and spent his last 10 years as a supervisor within the LAPD's elite Special Investigation Section (SIS). The SIS completed surveillance on suspected criminals for all of the LAPD's units and sometimes neighboring departments. Bennett said that his unit had a 99% conviction rate because of the airtight cases they built by observing the suspects planning the robbery, and sometimes watching the crime happen and making an arrest immediately after.

During his 33-year career, he rose through the ranks to detective three, which is a specialized detective who is considered a subject matter expert within the LAPD. He specialized in robbery and tracking down cop killers. One case in particular has always stood out in his mind.

Mylus Mondy was a US Customs and Border Protection agent who was murdered March 9, 2008. Mondy had just left his shift at the Los Angeles International Airport and had stopped by a Bank of America ATM in Ladera Heights, an unincorporated area in Los Angeles.

A robber was holding someone at gunpoint at the ATM location when Mondy went to withdraw $40 from the ATM. When he saw Mondy, the robber struck him on the head with the pistol and demanded money. When Mondy tried to get away, he was shot and killed him.

Bennett's team was called in to bring the murderer to justice. The team spent approximately a day and half chasing down leads, gathering evidence, and identifying different addresses to surveil.

Bennett supervised while one of his rookies in SIS sat "on the point," gathering information on traffic to and from one of the locations, scanning for their suspect, and collecting every little detail that might lead to an arrest. Suddenly, the rookie broke radio silence to report, "Boss, it's No. 1, and he's on the move."

charles bennettFootage from the security camera footage at the ATM where US Customs and Border Protection agent Mylus Mondy was shot and killed. Photo courtesy of Charles Bennett.


Bennett asked if he was absolutely sure.

"I'm 1,000% sure," the new officer fired back. Bennett ordered his man to let the suspect turn the corner and avoid alerting him of their presence in front of his house. Bennett knew others might be inside the suspect's house and, if alerted, would destroy any evidence the SIS unit would need to finalize charges against him.

As 23-year-old McKenzie Carl Bryant turned the corner, the SIS team waited patiently. Once there was a good cushion of distance between Bryant and his house, they brought down the hammer and arrested him.

"That guy is doing life without possibility of parole now, and you know, it was a really good feeling," Bennett said of Bryant's arrest. "You understand that you just got justice for a fellow officer who you didn't know. You didn't need to know him because you knew he was out there doing his job the best he could, and he didn't deserve what happened to him."

charles bennettFootage from the security camera footage at the ATM where US Customs and Border Protection agent Mylus Mondy was shot and killed. Photo courtesy of Charles Bennett.


The all-hands-on-deck approach to cases like Mondy's murder is what Bennett enjoyed most about working within SIS, as well as their ability to remain silent professionals. He said there were officers who worked on tracing leads and then fed verified information to the officers conducting ground surveillance. Though some LAPD units knew what SIS was doing, the unit largely remained anonymous. The LAPD command handled press conferences regarding the work of the SIS unit but never named them.

"We always go to the fallen officer's funeral, which is always sad," Bennett said.

In another case, Bennett helped arrest three of the five men responsible for the death of an officer.

"There were a lot of people quietly slapping us on the back, including the chief," he said.

In those times of sadness, the quiet slaps on the back brought back that "good feeling." While they couldn't change what happened, at least they had achieved some kind of justice for the fallen officer and their family.

This article originally appeared on Coffee or Die. Follow @CoffeeOrDieMag on Twitter.