MIGHTY CULTURE

This is what a Marine can expect from IRR muster

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Justis Beauregard)

So, you've been navigating the vast ocean of civilian life, all while growing an impressive beard and wearing that veteran's hat to places. Suddenly, one day, you get a letter — orders for Individual, Ready Reserve Muster. But at this point, you've been out for so long, and you're wondering why they're calling you back. Well, the Marine Corps wants to check in and make sure you're still ready to be called back into active service should they need you back in the rain, dealing pain.

It may seem like an inconvenience and, sure, it might be, but it's really not that bad. It's only a few hours on the weekend, and you can choose to go in the morning or the afternoon. On top of that, you'll get paid somewhere around $250, for three hours of time. You might show up and hear a bunch of fellow Marines complain, but it's not a field op. It's not raining. You just sit in a few rooms, fill out some paperwork, and then you're on your way.

Overall, here's what you can expect:


You get treated like a human being

There's going to be a ton of staff NCOs and officers hanging around muster. None of them are going to yell at you for your lack of shave, haircut, or proper greeting of the day. Not a single one will hit you with a, "hey there, Devil Dog," just to chew your ass for not saying good morning.

Furthermore, when you talk to the admin clerks and other Marines running the muster, they won't even require you to address them by rank. Here's the thing: they know you're a Marine, but they actually just treat you like another person, which is an improvement.

It almost brings a tear to your eye. Almost.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lucas Vega)

Waiting in lines

Did you expect anything different? Most of your time at muster will be spent in lines... go figure. Waiting to leave rooms, waiting to have someone look at a medical form, etc. You know the drill. Honestly, it's not as bad as any other line you've been through in the Marines. Not even close.

The only thing that makes those lines bad is the fact that you're trying to get out of there to go do civilian things, like eat real food, not shave, and not worry about formation.

Briefs

No, not your underpants — you know what we mean. You're going to get two briefs for a max of, like, 20 minutes, tops. One is from the VA and the other is to tell you about your options in the Reserve. It's definitely not anywhere near as bad as annual training briefs, which span the course of several days, and last for about eight hours each.

It's seriously not bad.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Daniel Hughes)

Medical screening

Right after you go through the briefs, you'll fill out a medical form to list any ailments you may have. If you do have some medical issues, you'll wait to go into a room for a screening where they'll decide whether or not you're still in good enough condition to deploy if necessary. Otherwise, you go straight to the administrative room.

Administrative tasks

This part probably takes the longest, and it's mostly just waiting (again, go figure). You're just there to verify that your contact information is correct as well as your Record of Emergency Data and other things. It's just a quick scan, sign, date, and then you verify your bank information, turn in the paperwork, and you're out of there.

A lot of other people might complain but, realistically, IRR Muster is not the worst thing you could do on a Saturday — especially when you compare it to your Saturdays spent as a Marine.

It doesn't take long, honestly.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Daniel Hughes)