Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY CULTURE
Maggie BenZvi

Meet Julie Golob: Army veteran, professional shooter, NRA board member

When she was 8 years old, Julie Golob got an unexpected Christmas present from her grandfather — he had bought all his grandchildren life memberships to the National Rifle Association.

"He was an all-around Rush Limbaugh guy, World War II veteran, the guy back in the '80s wearing the NRA cap when it wasn't so popular. We weren't exactly thrilled," Golob said, laughing, "but I knew how much it meant to him, something he so believed in."

Decades later, Golob is thankful for a gift that ended up reflecting so much of where life would take her.


Julie Golob is a decorated professional shooter for Team Smith & Wesson.

(Photo courtesy of Julie Golob)

Golob is now not only a recently seated member of the NRA's Board of Directors, she is also a successful author and one of the most decorated female competitive shooters in America. She is the only woman to have won all seven divisions of the United States Practical Shooting Association (USPSA) National Championships, as well as a multiple International Practical Shooting Confederation (IPSC) Ladies Classic title winner. In 2017, she won the gold in the Lady Classic division at the IPSC Handgun World Shoot.

Her career in competitive shooting began as a teenager in Seneca Falls, New York, where her dad taught her to shoot for fun and competition. She was recruited by the U.S. Army to join their shooting team after high school by enlisting to serve in the military police.

"The Army marksmanship unit was the cream of the crop," Golob said, "so having a dedicated unit for shooters was definitely exciting. It was one of those things that I really needed to make the commitment for, signing up for five years to be a soldier in the Army."

An AMU poster of Golob from 1999.

(Courtesy of Julie Golob)

But commitment is one thing Golob has never lacked when it comes to shooting. "Even as a kid," Golob remembered, "I always wanted to be the best at something, and I was always frustrated that I couldn't find out what that 'best' was. But when I found shooting, I realized that if I worked hard at it, I could set goals and I could meet them. And it's that constant goal setting and achieving those goals that makes me feel very fulfilled. It gives me an empowered confidence."

After her time in the Army, Golob took a break from shooting with the intention of becoming an English teacher — but she missed it.

"I missed the people in the sport the most," Golob said. "I rediscovered all the reasons I enjoyed shooting from when I was a kid instead of doing it as a JOB job. I just did it for fun … and then it became a job again."

Golob is the only 7 Division USPSA Ladies National Champion; she also has over 140 major wins in state, regional, and international competitions and more than 50 national and world titles.

(Photo courtesy of Julie Golob)

Golob also parlayed her shooting success into a second career as an author. Her first book, "Shoot: Your Guide to Shooting and Competition," is a primer for anyone interested in learning more about the shooting sports.

Her second book grew out of the other most important role she plays: the mother of two young daughters. So she wrote "Toys, Tools, Guns, and Rules."

"I was always finding resources that were for boys, dads and sons specifically," Golob said. "And firearm safety is universal. It should be something every child learns. My husband is in law enforcement, so it's a part of our lives. We always stop and answer the questions, they always know the rules, and it's not anything that's taboo."

Her older daughter was 9 years old when they competed together in their first Empire Championship. "I love being a mom," Golob said enthusiastically. "So being able to bring my daughter with me to a few competitions here and there is really icing on the cake."

When not shooting, Golob participates in NRATV and posts tips and tricks to her own JulieG.TV YouTube channel. Golob also advocates for the Second Amendment as a guest on podcasts and TV shows.

(Photo courtesy of Julie Golob)

As another platform to further the understanding of and support for the shooting sports, Golob ran for and was elected to the NRA's Board of Directors. She hopes the position will allow her to advocate to increase participation in shooting sports.

"I never even realized how many wonderful programs we have until I became a director, but we really need to connect the dots between those programs and the people who might be interested in them," Golob said. "It's not an ad on social media and that sort of thing — we really need to get back to that grassroots level, help the local clubs connect and reach the people in their communities."

Although approximately only 10 percent of gun owners belong to the NRA, Golob is bullish on their role as "the lead organization, fighting the fight at the highest levels." When asked why some gun owners might be skeptical about joining, she mused, "I think it comes down to identifying with a specific group. I do understand — I don't agree with absolutely every message we put out. But we have 5 million members. That's a huge number of voices. As a collective group, we are very, very powerful."

"I love the thrill of competing and testing my skills on a challenging course of fire," Golob wrote on her website's blog at the end of the 2018 shooting season.

(Photo courtesy of Julie Golob)

Golob also is sympathetic to people who do not view the Second Amendment in the same way that she and the rest of the NRA's membership do. "At the end of the day we all want the same things," Golob said. "We want people to be safe, we want people to feel the world is a good place to live in, and we don't want horrible things to happen. It's just the direction of how we get there. We need to maybe not head in the opposite direction but maybe just take a whole new direction."

To Golob, that new direction involves open communication between dissenting groups. While she is uncompromising on her wholesale support for the Second Amendment, she recognizes that the NRA may need to work harder to spread their message to skeptics. "We need to do a better job of connecting with people who have that emotional reaction and let them know that we are all on the same side," she sad. "But the challenge is getting in the room. We've got to get in the room."

At an age where many professional athletes hit "the mark of the slow decline," as Golob laughingly described it, she somehow finds a way to balance her responsibilities as a shooter, a mom, an author, and now an NRA board member.

"When I was in the military," she said, "I went to 24 matches in a year. And I don't know if I want to live that life right now."

This article originally appeared on Coffee or Die. Follow @CoffeeOrDieMag on Twitter.