MIGHTY CULTURE

5 reasons military kids make Veterans Day fun

Military kids are a unique breed. They grow up too fast during deployments and are wise beyond their years. They ask tough questions about war, politics, furloughs, and DD93s because they overhear these things at the dinner table. But, some of the best things about military kids are their comments. The days and weeks leading up to Veterans Day in a house with military kids are just plain fun.


1. They are so proud of their veterans.

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Frequently, military-friendly schools will line the halls with artwork honoring veterans. One year, my son brought home a few half-sheets of paper that were to be filled in by our family about the veterans in our family. Our son, who was in early elementary school at that point, said, "We need so many more, Mom. We have TONS of veterans in our family." From grandparents to aunts and uncles to cousins to parents and siblings, military kids have a fierce pride in every single person who served.

2. They know the history.

"Veterans day began as Armistice Day but was later changed by President Eisenhower in 1954," I heard from the back seat. Someone was practicing lines for the upcoming Veterans Day program at their school. "Veterans day com…commem...commemorates veterans of all wars."

3. They understand the sacrifices.

You'll never find a military kid who confuses Memorial Day, Armed Forces Day, and Veterans Day. Ever. They know the difference, they understand why those things are different, and they don't want to talk about it again. Sure, they'll be excited if their parent gets a free dessert at Chick-fil-A on Veterans Day or if there's a military discount, that means they can spend more at the toy store, but overall, they just want their parents home with them.

4. They don’t mind having to go to school.

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In some school districts, Veterans Day is not a school holiday. For military families, this can be a hard adjustment as most service members in garrison will have this day off. But one thing we've discovered is that the schools that remain in session have fantastic Veterans Day programs, on a day where active duty and veteran parents can actually attend. One child equated going to school on Veterans Day as a military kid to their parent having to work on Christmas. Sometimes you have to do your job on a holiday.

5. They have some fierce branch pride.

As the token Army family in a Navy community, my children went to a school whose mascot was the captains. They had a giant anchor out front, and they rode the "Anchor bus." They wore their "Proud Army Brat" t-shirts a lot that year. And we were quite possibly the only people celebrating Army's win that December in Pensacola, Florida.

Veterans Day is a great time to teach your children about the significance behind the day. You can read books together, attend a parade, or make poppies. If you are stationed overseas, you can take a trip to visit historic battlefields and cemeteries. And when they get older, you can binge-watch Band of Brothers with them. Now that is a military parenting win.