Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY CULTURE

Medal of Honor Recipient Staff Sgt. David G. Bellavia is a monument of a man

I never went to Afghanistan. Iraq was my war, and when I think back about my deployments, there are very few things that I miss. I definitely don't relish the sand storms or the dirt or the myriad of dangers lurking behind every piece of trash (and there is a sh#%load of trash).


Instead, I sometimes think back to those quiet moments of deployment, especially ones when I needed the rush of nicotine before stepping off on patrol or the pull of a long drag to settle down from one. Those frequent cigarette breaks with my fellow Marines were some of the most memorable moments of my life. I cherish them.

It's been a decade since I was in the sandbox and I don't smoke anymore, but as I unlock the door to We Are The Mighty, I have the crazy urge to light up. I'm nervous. Unlike other conflicts in our history, there isn't a sacred place, a monument, for veterans of my generation to visit and reflect on our war and maybe even smoke a cigarette like old times. While that place may come someday, today we only have each other, and that's why I'm nervous. I'm about to meet Staff Sgt. David Bellavia, the first and only living Medal of Honor recipient from the Iraq war.

The Medal of Honor is the nation's highest award for valor, and it often comes at a significant price. Since WWII, 60% of all medals awarded for valor are posthumous and, for those who are able to receive the medal while living, the process is often long and arduous. Many are forced to relive and describe one of the worst days of their life — over and over again. As I prepare for the interview, I want to be sensitive to all Staff Sgt. Bellavia and his platoon in the 2-2 Ramrod faced during their war. But their story is special. They fought, and Staff Sgt. Bellavia earned his honor during hand-to-hand combat while clearing houses [Official Citation] in one of the most iconic battles: Fallujah.

Fallujah is a place that almost every Iraq war veteran has heard of. Like Iwo Jima or Hue, this battle defines an entire war. As I contemplate this idea, Staff Sgt. Bellavia and his full Army escort enter my office. As I reach out to shake Staff Sgt. Bellavia's hand, I can't help but think I am shaking the hand of a man who is the living monument to my war.

As I meet Staff Sgt. Bellavia, thankfully, he calms my nerves. First, he's a very humble, open guy. He introduces himself as "Dave." A modest father of three who's been called back to service to tour the country in the wake of his medal ceremony. Second, he's funny — like, really funny. He cracks a joke about how hard it is to put on a uniform after fifteen years, and I can relate; there's no way I could wear my uniform now either. This is exactly the kind of guy who I would share a cigarette with. We laugh together as the cameras turn on.

Staff Sgt. David Bellavia MOH Lincoln Memorial Visit.

Welcome to We Are The Mighty. So, we all have a crazy story of how we got in uniform... What's yours?

DB: Sure. I joined the Army in 1999. My Army story's a little bit crazy because my son was born with some birth defects. He's good now, but the Army didn't know what to do. So they put me on what's called a "compassionate reassignment." So right out of basic training, infantry cord, I go to a recruiting station for two and a half years, which is the worst gig because you're not a recruiter, you're not an infantryman. You're just there telling the Army story, which you don't know anything of because you don't have an Army story. And when September 11th happened, the Army was like, "Hey, your son's not officially healthy. You either get out or go on what's called an 'All Others Tour.'"

What's an "All Other's Tour"?

DB: So, I had a choice of basically getting out of the Army or just going for three years without my family... and I chose the Army. And so I went to Germany for three years. I didn't see the family except for block leave, and that was really tough. But it was the best decision I made because of the relationships and the guys, it was really special.

Special? How so?

DB: Yeah. It's always great to introduce young 18-year-old Americans to Bavarian beer.

Haha. Nice. Did you deploy from there?

DB: Yeah. I deployed to Kosovo in 2002, and then back-to-back from Kosovo to Iraq for 12 months, 2004 to 2005.

Kosovo? What was that like?

DB: It's unbelievable. The one thing that I learned is that, for whatever reason, those kids in Kosovo could burn a DVD of a movie that is still in production. I don't even know ... they're like, "Hey, have you seen X-Men 2?" I'm like, "It comes out in a month," and like, "Here it is." I'm like, "How is that possible? How do you have access to B-roll footage of a Marvel film before it's made?" But these guys, [they] can't figure out plumbing. [They] can't get a mass transit system, but [they] can burn any movie within hours of Ron Howard saying, cut." It's done. It's crazy.

Do you have a family history of military service?

DB: I grew up on Lake Ontario. Small little town. My dad was a dentist. I was the youngest of four kids. Every one of my brothers has like either multiple master's degrees or like PhDs. I had two brothers who went to seminary. My grandad was in the Normandy campaign. [Not] D-Day. This was the 35 days after D-Day, but it was the hedgerows, ton of fighting. He would tell me his World War II stories at like ... I'd be six years old just listening to this stuff. He's still with us. He's 99.

Was he your inspiration for joining the Army?

DB: The other thing was, I remember in high school, before the book came out, before there was a 'Black Hawk Down' movie, I watched the [bodies] being just dragged through the streets [of Mogadishu], that really affected me. I wanted to avenge that.

So before you got into the Army, what did courage mean to you?

DB: I had no idea what I was getting into. They told me 11 XRAY meant like extra special infantry. So courage to me was being able to endure rain and having wet socks because there was no thought of combat. Kosovo was the big war and no offense, but it wasn't really much of a war. It was kind of a ... when I got to Kosovo it was like, "Hey, take your helmets off. Soft cap."

Let's jump ahead. So you end up in 2-2 from 1st Infantry Division, The Ramrods. And now we're at war with Iraq. What does that feel like?

DB: Well, I mean, first of all, we're watching the invasion of Iraq in like a chow hall with a potato bar in Kosovo. And so the 1st Infantry Division had such an incredible legacy of just always being first to fight. We had our own movie. I remember watching The Big Red One movie, if I'm going to join the Army, I want to be in The Big Red One. No one questioned why Lee Marvin was like a 62-year-old squad leader in D-Day. You know what I mean? He's got all white hair.

Yeah, he must have been passed over a few times...

DB: Do you know what I'm saying? Like, why is he here? I love that movie. I loved just all the stories of what The Big Red One stood for. And the take away was that, we were a peacekeeping, forward-deployed division in Germany and a war was happening in Afghanistan. A war was happening in Iraq, and we were going to miss out on it. And so my chain of command took it upon themselves in nine months of Kosovo to just train us for what was coming down the road. And we hated that because we were doing 15-hour patrols and presence and yet we were doing bunker drills and clearing houses and my God, all that training ended up saving our life because we were so ready when the fight initially came.

A year later, you were in Iraq outside Fallujah. And it was also your birthday?

DB: Yeah, November 10th [2004] was my 29th birthday. And I just remember thinking ... as a kid, I'd walk through a cemetery, and I would see people born and died on the same day on their tombstone. And I just thought, "Man, that's gotta just be the worst." I was just, "Get me to midnight. At least I can have something different on there." There were a lot of times where you just give up.

And you were a squad leader at this point?

DB: Yeah.

How did you manage the stress maybe even fear that you were about to lead your soldiers in one of the most violent battles of the Iraq war?

DB: When I was on block leave from Iraq, I ran into a crusty Vietnam guy, and he told me ... I was telling him everything I was going through. I was so mad. I saw like a UPS guy, and I couldn't understand why people were normal. They had no connection to what the hell was happening. And I was looking at this UPS guy deliver packages and be so happy, and I'm like, "What the ... how is this?" ... and this Vietnam guy told me, he's like, "You still believe that you're coming home. And once you give that up, once you just acknowledge that you have no control over this, everything is far more manageable. You can compartmentalize everything." It was the best advice that we had is that it's not about you... don't worry about your own survivability, worry about your subordinates, worry about them, put all your ... anything that causes stress, put that below your young guys and then if you come home, that's a bonus.

Is that what you were thinking when you got to a house full of insurgents in Fallujah? The house where you earned the Medal of Honor?

DB: So yeah, this is basically what happened in Fallujah. So [in] Anbar Province, 82nd Airborne leaves, Marine Corps comes in. This is their fight. It's very awkward to be receiving anything for Fallujah when so many Marines... you got Brian Chontosh, Brad Kasal, and Rafael Peralta, legends in the Marine Corps, did so many incredible things. We were there just to supplement them.

You did much more than support.

DB: Fallujah was left basically unmolested for six months, and the Marine Corps had a very difficult time breaching through. So what ended up happening is everyone was on one side from the north pushing in, and the only real clear breach lane [was ours]. We got into the city expecting everyone to be on our shoulder. And when we pushed through, it took like two days for the rest of the task force to get into the city. In that 48-hour period, we had very little support, and we were pretty much the only game in town. And it developed this really odd way of, you got to your objective, you cleared it, and then you massaged back, started the invasion again, cleared it. Uh-oh, come back, do it again. And so you're refighting in neighborhoods that you've been almost four times at that point. And so we got a report that there were six to eight, possibly 10 bad guys in a little neighborhood block. And we were clearing all these different buildings out and nothing. I mean, we'd get blood, or you'd see a weapons caches, but you just missed the guys, and we finally end up in the last house, and that's when it all went down.

And then your soldiers get trapped inside?

DB: Yeah. So I'm on one side of the house, the other guys are on the other side, and basically, these guys are shooting belt-fed machine guns through a door. We have to break contact. My two guys outside with 240 Bravos that were John J. Rambo firing those things from the shoulder. Those rounds are coming in, the PKM rounds are coming out. No one can move. If anything that night that really took the most intestinal fortitude, it was standing in that door with that SAW because, again, I don't know how many people there are. I just know that there's fire coming out. And I got to be honest with you, you come up with a plan, and then you're going to execute the plan, and then you just want to stall because your legs won't walk, your body won't move.

So you grab a M-249 SAW and charge inside? What were you thinking? What was going through your head at this point?

DB: I remember thinking to myself, "I want to hook my finger around this trigger, not the way we're trained to do, which is to three-second burst. But if I get hit, I want to just hold it down and just get enough fire." And as soon as I get in that door frame, I'm looking at these guys [and] they're not intimidated at all. The SAW was a runaway. On the range, you would break the links, point it to a safe direction. But here it's just, "Well, I'll just keep it on them." I'm not hitting anything, I'm not hitting them, and I just clunk out on ammo. Those 200 rounds went like nanoseconds. It felt like far too quick. So I'm like, "could I have shot 200 rounds at like five feet and missed every single person?" I just found my body just running out of the house. And as I'm doing it, you hear, and you feel rounds everywhere, and you're just like, "Man, that was worthless." And so I was upset. I was angry.

And you traded the SAW for an M-4 and went back inside the house?

DB: Well, it was me, [and] Scott Lawson, who died in 2013, but he went in with me, and I had three SAW gunners. I was worried that these [insurgents] were going to run out of the house and we're going to lose them and then they're going to kill someone or we're going to get killed by them down the road. So I set up the SAW gunners around the courtyard, and I was just going to run in there like an idiot and try to push them out. And again, I had no real idea how many were in there. I like my chances against wounded guys that we've been shooting at repeatedly. So I figured me and Lawson could at least ding them up and then the next wave of Americans could finish them off.

And you did finish them off. Five to be exact. I have one specific question. There's a moment that I read about that. Did you smoke a cigarette during the fight?

DB: I did. I did. So, okay, understand that when you're in [the house] ... your night vision works like a cat's eye, right? I'm not telling you anything you don't know. I've never been in this building before. And after this guy jumps out of a wardrobe and I hit him five times, I was just like, "Man, I need a smoke." I don't have my helmet, my IBA is open, I don't ... my rifle is somewhere in the smoke. And I just am like, "You know, I need a smoke right now."

With the enemy still in the house?

DB: I'm an infantryman. I know how to smoke at night. I'm well-rehearsed at cupping the hands and holding. And so my biggest fear was that my guys were going to come in the building and because I was just around the enemy, I was going to get popped. So I just tried to hug a wall where I knew I couldn't be hit by anything and just have a quick smoke and that's when this guy jumps off the roof right in front of me and breaks his leg or does something horrible to himself. But it was just, yeah, it was stress level ... that's the weird thing about that close quarter proximity. You're super confident. "I'm Thor, I could do all of this, America." And then you slip and fall and almost get your head blown off, and you're like, "What am I thinking? I'm an idiot. This was a horrible idea." And then you see fear in the [enemy's] eyes, and you're like, "Oh, they're scared, I got this, everything's great."

That's the most badass smoke break that I've ever heard of.

DB: In the moment, grab a smoke.

Let's move into afterward. You got out of the Army. What have you been doing since you left?

DB: So I came home right during the whole political soccer ball of Iraq. So I started a group with a bunch of other Marines called Vets for Freedom, and we just went out there and said, "Hey, don't send us to fight unless you want us to finish it. Right? I mean, we didn't vote for this thing. We're the ones adjudicating this fight. You want to defund it. I mean, we lost our buddies out there. This is more important than some political soccer ball." And so in order to become apolitical, we became uber-political, and I just hated it. That's not what we wanted to do. So I started focusing more on just veterans in normal life.

Do you think Veterans can find some kind of "normal" in civilian life?

DB: We're not walking around with high and tights, we're not wearing camouflage to work, but the type of men and women who served this country are special, and we're volunteering to do it. And when we come home, we would like to make America as great as we did serving it in uniform and we want to be teachers and we want to be coaches, and we want to lead at home the way we did in battle.

What was it like taking off the uniform and leading in a different way?

DB: The first thing I learned right off the bat is that no civilian wants to know when you're going to the bathroom. Right? Because I'm accustomed to being like, "Hey, I'm going to go to the bathroom. I'm going to go take a leak." No civilian ever wants to hear that. So I learned some tough lessons right off the bat.

And now, as a business owner, what do you tell other veterans when you see them?

DB: When I wore the veteran thing on my sleeve, I found that I was a bigger spectacle. And so I just decided to just compartmentalize that. Let it go, move on with your life, tell them, "Oh yeah, I served too," and most people, especially the Vietnam generation, they didn't get any of this reflexive love. They didn't get free tickets to Bush Gardens. They didn't get applause when they walked through the airport. So I've been really appreciative of that Vietnam generation protecting us from what they went through, and also their ability to kind of do a victory lap for our generation when we come home. And these guys in the workplace, what they've been able to accomplish. I love that. When I find out someone's a vet, it's like a Christian in the Catacomb, a little wink. You do the secret handshake, and that resume goes right to the top. I want that ... I don't care what you did.

You're also a family man now, what do you tell your kids about courage and service?

DB: I tell them that the United States Army is the greatest ... we've been fighting bullies since 1775 right? I've always told my kids, "I will never ... if you come home with a fat lip because you were defending someone who couldn't defend themselves, I don't care what the school does, I don't care what the law does. You will defend people who can't defend themselves. That is why we're on this earth." We're there to take care of our weaker brother. We're there to take care of our weaker sister.

You also co-wrote a best selling memoir about your experience in Fallujah called House to House. Can you tell me briefly about the book?

DB: Well, yeah I've been going through that for a while. When I came out, there were very few memoirs written but, I don't know if I would've made that choice again because I didn't want to write [about me]. I wanted to write about my soldiers. My soldiers were the greatest men I've ever met in my life. They still are. And what we did together, we weren't SEALs, we weren't Green Berets [or] Recon. We were just knuckle-dragging, mouth-breathers. That's what we were, just average soldiers doing above average things because we found ourselves in those situations.

One last question. Do you still smoke?

DB: I am a recovering smoker. I do some tobacco products here and there and nicotine lozenges, a little dip. But I'm trying to beat that. But now the smoking is definitely gone. I've graduated.

Dave, this has truly been an honor. Anything else I missed?

DB: No, you got it.

Click HERE to read more about Staff Sgt. David Bellavia's actions which, earned him the distinguished role as the first and only living Medal of Honor recipient of the Iraq war.