Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY CULTURE
Sean Kimmons

Unique new veterans memorial installed 40 feet under the sea

(Video still by Bill Mills)

As soon as Shawn Campbell saw his name on a plaque next to a statue sunken 40 feet on the seafloor, the memories of soldiers he had once served with flooded his mind.

The life-size statue, one of a dozen concrete figures that make up the nation's only underwater veterans memorial, depicted a soldier wearing combat gear from the Iraq War — a war he had fought in three separate times.

"It really took my breath away," said the former staff sergeant, now a master diver at a Florida dive shop. "It was a huge honor."

His company made a donation to place his name at the base of the statue before the figures were recently installed about 10 miles off the coast of Clearwater, Florida.


The memorial, called Circle of Heroes, honors the entire military with statues portraying a variety of service members in what organizers hope will serve as a therapeutic dive for veterans and a unique diving experience for all.

Plans call for an additional 12 statues to be added to the memorial next year.

Circle of Heroes is the nation's only memorial of its kind and will eventually have 24 life-size statues depicting troops from all services.

(Circle of Heroes)

For Campbell, who served about a decade in the Army as a combat medic, he said the memorial helped him remember those who never returned home and those who struggled once they did.

"I had a lot of friends who didn't make it back," he said Aug.12, 2019, a week after the memorial officially opened. "And even more who did make it back, but then couldn't win the battle with themselves after the war."

One such friend was Staff Sgt. Victor Cota. He and Campbell had been in the same 4th Infantry Division unit that provided security for senior leaders traveling in and around Baghdad.

On May 14, 2008, Cota's vehicle hit a roadside bomb, killing the 33-year-old Tucson, Arizona, native.

"He was a really good friend of mine," Campbell said. "We lost him during [my] second deployment."

In 2013, Campbell left the Army to finish his associate's degree and then worked as a commercial deep sea diver. He now teaches courses at a dive shop in the Tampa area, where he grew up.

Shawn Campbell, a former staff sergeant and now a master diver, looks at his name on a plaque next to one of the statues at the Circle of Heroes underwater veterans memorial off the coast of Clearwater, Fla.

(Video still by Bill Mills)

"I was like, well, if I survived the war, I'm going to start doing everything I want to do now," he said.

Campbell said scuba diving is a relaxing activity that calms his post-traumatic stress and gives him time to analyze his thoughts in peace.

"It helps me deal with things," he said. "It's kind of hard to have a bad day when you're underwater and you get to reflect upon yourself."

Former Staff Sgt. Jace Badia, also a diving instructor, agreed, saying the sport gives him more freedom of movement.

Badia, an infantryman who lost his left leg above the knee to a roadside bomb in Iraq, said he and others who have had amputated limbs can move however they like while floating below the surface.

He even knows a blind veteran who enjoys scuba diving.

"If you don't have the ability to run because of prosthetics, you can get in the water with a tank and you can swim as fast as you want," he said. "Nothing is stopping you."

Shawn Campbell, a former staff sergeant and now a master diver, had a statue dedicated to him at the Circle of Heroes underwater veterans memorial off the coast of Clearwater, Fla.

(Shawn Campbell)

Badia, who manned a boat so other wounded veterans could dive around the memorial last week, said he is looking forward to seeing it soon in an upcoming dive.

"I can't believe that they finally made an underwater memorial for [service members]," he said. "That's amazing, I never even thought that was possible."

While memorials are typically above ground, this one can allow visitors to connect to it on a deeper level. There is even a nonprofit that specifically takes wounded veterans to the site as an alternative form of therapy.

"The one thing about scuba diving is when you're down there, even if you're in a group, you're still by yourself," Campbell said. "You have no choice but to reflect on what you're looking at.

"It's more of a serene experience that you never get an opportunity to experience above the water."

This article originally appeared on United States Army. Follow @USArmy on Twitter.