America didn't just call on the troops to wage war, she called upon all her people to fight food shortage and a depression with gardens -- "Victory gardens" -- to be specific. In the early 1940s, when food rationing came into place, everyday Americans were turning up their yards to produce not just enough food for their families, but for their neighbors as well.

It's safe to say a worldwide pandemic has given us cause to unearth the history of Victory Gardens and take the matter of a potential food shortage into our own, capable hands.

Here's a thing or two you need to know about how to raise your shovels as your grandparents or great grandparents did long ago.


1. Canned food was limited 

Canned food was rationed both to preserve tin for military use but also to decrease the strain on food transportation. Reducing "food miles" with sustainable urban agriculture was exactly how families and friends stayed supplied with fresh produce. Put down the can of lima beans you're never going to eat and pick up some seeds instead.

2. The know-how

Victory gardens were pushed at a national level, and informational pamphlets (pre-internet) were distributed. Community committees were organized to both assist newcomers and inform neighbors of what was being grown and where. Luckily for us, there's a whole internet full of information, and local agricultural extensions to call, ensuring social distancing is still met.

3. So easy a child could do it 

Children participated in gardening both out of necessity and to ensure all that good food knowledge didn't go to waste. Need something for your kids to do? Let them tend to your budding garden at home; it's a delicious form of education.

4. It doesn’t take a farm

The average American lawn has more than enough space to grow everything your family needs and more. Learning what plants like to cohabitate in the soil will maximize your growing potential.

5. Never forget 

How to rely on ourselves has been a skill lost to the "lazy" days of supermarkets stocked to the brim with internationally-grown produce. It may have taken a pandemic, but re-educating America on how to fend for themselves needs to be a skillset we value once again. We need to pass down precious knowledge of food and to become aware once again of the immense value food has in our lives.

Great things have happened throughout history during times of struggle. Every single one of us has the opportunity to make this world better, stronger and more resilient than ever before.