Hey, I get it: When you're preparing for deployment, the last thing you want is a honey-do list from your spouse. You have your own gear to take care of, paperwork to complete, and stuff to pack. Your spouse, on the other hand, will be at home during the months that you're away. Can't some of their to-do list wait until you're gone? After all, they'll have the whole deployment to take care of it. What's the rush, right?

Here's the deal: Just as you must prepare your gear and put your things in order to prepare for your deployment, your spouse has to get the house and the family ready for their own "mission." It's pretty much guaranteed that as soon as you walk out the door, something's going to go wrong: the car will break down, appliances will leak, or the dog will get sick. If you don't help your spouse prepare for those emergencies, then they won't be fully equipped to handle their mission. You wouldn't send troops off to train without first arranging logistics and ammo. In the same way, you have to take care of some logistical details at home before you deploy and leave your spouse as the only adult responsible for the entire household. There are several things you can review with your spouse to make everyone's deployment go more smoothly.

Don't skip these mission-essential pre-deployment tasks with your spouse.


1. Paperwork

(U.S. Air Force photo by Gina Randall)

There's a reason your CO keeps hounding you to complete your Power of Attorney, Will, and other documents — they're actually really important! Without a Power of Attorney, your spouse will basically be treated like a second-class citizen on base. They won't be able to renew or replace an ID card if they lose it while you're away. They can't change the lease, buy or sell a vehicle, or handle any banking problems that might arise. If you have children, it's important that your spouse completes a Family Care Plan so that someone is designated to take care of the kids if your spouse ends up in the hospital from a car accident. Take the time to discuss this paperwork with your spouse so they won't struggle during unexpected deployment situations.

2. Comm check

(Photo by Staff Sgt. April Davis)

You may not know exactly what communication options you'll have during deployment, but discuss your expectations with your spouse so you can both get on the same page. How will you handle the time difference? Will you try to call when early in the morning or in the evening? How often will you try to call, message, or video? What's the protocol if one of you misses a call or doesn't answer in time? Finally, make sure your spouse knows how to send a Red Cross message. If there's a family emergency, the Red Cross can contact you even when you don't have internet access. If your spouse knows how to get to the Red Cross website, it will take the weight off their shoulders during a major emergency.

3. Discuss car maintenance

Have you ever returned from deployment only to discover that your car has a dead battery and flat tires? Save yourselves the cost and trouble with some simple preventative maintenance. If you're typically the one responsible for vehicle maintenance, remind your spouse when to do an oil change and how often to get the tires rotated. If your vehicle will sit unused during the deployment, ask your spouse to start the engine and let it idle at least once a week. This will prevent the battery from dying. If they occasionally drive it around the block and park it in a different position, that'll help prevent flat tires.

4. Review home maintenance

If you're renting or living on base, just make sure your spouse knows how to contact maintenance or the landlord. If you own your home, things get more complicated. Walk through the house together and discuss areas of regular or seasonal maintenance. Air filters should get changed monthly. Gutters should be cleaned in Fall. Discuss outdoor chores, like lawn maintenance and snow removal. Your spouse should know the location of the breaker box and water shut-off valves, in case the dreaded "Deployment Curse" visits your house.

5. Adjust the household budget

You and your spouse both need to understand how the deployment will affect your family's income, and then adjust accordingly. If you are making more money during deployment, how will you save or spend the extra? Will it go toward paying down debts? Or will you save up for a post-deployment vacation? Sometimes, deployments reduce the household budget. You might have to pay for food and Internet at your deployed location. Your spouse may decrease their work hours or register for a class. They may have additional costs for childcare or lawn maintenance. It's better to discuss these changes and your intended budget before deployment so you aren't both accusing each other of mismanaging money!

6. Write down your passwords

You wouldn't send your team on a mission without clear instructions and the best equipment, right? Then don't expect your spouse to manage the bills and your account memberships without passwords! Log into any banking or bill payment website you use, and write down your login name and password. Do the same for your gaming accounts, renewable memberships, etc. It's likely that something will need to be suspended, renewed, or canceled during your deployment. Writing down the passwords will make it possible for your spouse to do that for you.

Having these pre-deployment conversations now may not be easy or fun, but it's definitely important to help your spouse feel squared away before deployment. This will reduce deployment stress for both of you, help your deployment communication go smoothly, and get you both prepared for your respective, upcoming missions.