MIGHTY CULTURE

Same-sex couples aren’t unicorns

June is gay pride month. It is a time to not only reflect on the history of those who lost their lives and fought for equal rights for the LGBTQ community, but to also celebrate who they are.

Jessica Manfre

(Courtesy of Military Spouse)

Mallory and Stacy "Lux" Krauss are deeply proud of how far things have come since the riots of Stonewall, but they also know this country still has a lot more work to do.

"When I joined the Coast Guard, it was right after they repealed 'Don't Ask Don't Tell'. Honest to God, I went to the recruiter that very next day," Lux shared.

She explained that prior to the repeal, she had wanted to join, but said she couldn't be a part of something that wasn't inclusive and accepting of all people.


When the 'Don't Ask Don't Tell' repeal was being discussed within congress, the Coast Guard and the Navy were the only two branches of service that didn't initially oppose it.

(Courtesy of Military Spouse)

Mallory and Lux met at the 2013 pride parade in San Francisco, while they were both in California attending "A" schools for the United States Coast Guard. It was the first year that the military was allowing participation in pride events and both had been asked to walk in the parade.

"The pride parade is important because it's a remembrance of Stonewall, but it's also to say, 'Hey, we are here and this is who we are'," Lux shared.

Following that parade, they began dating. They returned to that same parade a year later. It was there that Mallory proposed to Lux. They married not long after that and eventually Mallory decided to leave the Coast Guard. They now have two sons, born in 2016 and 2020. Both boys were carried by Lux and Mallory is also listed on both of their birth certificates as their mother, something that only became legal shortly before their first son was born.

(Courtesy of Military Spouse)

Although things are moving forward, a lingering fear is always present for both of them.

"It still makes me nervous to go to any new command and share that I have a wife and children. You never know, you could have that one person who may be of the extreme who has the ability to ruin your career because you are gay," said Lux.

She explained that even now when the Coast Guard puts something official out about pride or inclusivity on their social media, the comments can turn hateful fast and many of those commenting negatively are in the Coast Guard themselves.

That feeling of nervousness is ever present in everything they do and it's something that many in the LGBTQ community are deeply familiar with. Despite multiple laws being passed to assure equality, there are still those in this country who are adamantly opposed to acknowledging and accepting them.

Once while standing in line at a candy story in Tennessee, a man behind them asked if they were gay. Although this was the first time they'd ever been rudely asked that question, they were very familiar with stares of others. Everywhere they go, especially in the southern states, they wonder if they'll be accepted.

Now, they have to worry for their children too.

While getting one of their boys registered for a recent medical procedure, Mallory was filling out the paperwork when she was asked who the mom was. She explained that both she and Lux were his moms. The response was one they had always dreaded hearing, 'but who is the real mom?' This is a question that most straight couples will never have to face hearing.

Most will also never have to worry about legal custody being questioned either.

"There's a grey area, if something were to happen to Lux and her parents wanted to take our children, they might legally be able to," said Mallory.

She explained that although she is on their birth certificates, because she isn't biologically related to them that risk is present unless she legally adopts them or specific laws are passed to protect them. Although Mallory said she knows her in-laws would never do that, it's still something that no parent should ever have to think about.

Every time they move on Coast Guard orders, they wonder how the new doctor or school will react to their family. They both shared that so far, their experiences have been positive but they look forward to the day they don't have to think about it. Although this country has come a long way since Stonewall, more work still has to be done. When asked what pride month means to them and what they want other military families to know, it was easy for them to respond.

They don't want to be treated like unicorns.

"People need to realize, we are not any different from any other family," said Mallory with a laugh. "We have our kids and we are worried about their future, there's nothing special about us. We just want to be like everyone else," Lux shared.

To learn more about the history of oppression and violence those in the LGBTQ community experienced and the inequality they still face today, click here.

This article originally appeared on Military Spouse. Follow @MilSpouseMag on Twitter.