MIGHTY CULTURE

5 cool photos of the Coast Guard escorting tall ships

The Coast Guard often escorts boats and ships transiting American waterways, which means they can occasionally get their photos taken with tall ships that look like they belong more in a Black Sails episode than on the open sea in modern days.

Portsmouth, New Hampshire, holds an annual sailing festival that features all sorts of ships and boats making their way up the Piscataqua River. One of the big attractions at the festival, when they come, are "tall ships," full-rigged sailing vessels reminiscent of the days of European colonialism — and the pirates who preyed on them.


(U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Keegan)

Of course, with so many ships moving through coastal waters and into river waters, the Coast Guard has a role in ensuring that everyone passes through safely. Coast Guard vessels escort the tall ships for parts of their journeys.

(U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Keegan)

The ships spend a lot of their time providing educational programs to local students and residents, even training selected high school students in crewing the ships.

(U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Keegan)

The fun isn't just reserved for the students. For between $50 and $100, you can buy a ticket to ride for a short distance and enjoy a few drinks while aboard — you'll also be treated to the antics of an on-board pirate actor.

(U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Keegan)

The actors playing pirates also do a bit of educating while on shore, but there's nothing quite like learning about piracy while slightly buzzed on a classic tall ship.

(U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Keegan)

Of course, if the pirates get too crazy, the Coast Guard is always there. Sure, the Revenue Cutter Service didn't have a perfect record against real-world pirates, and that ship is significantly smaller than the tall ships, but the tall ships lack the cannons of their forebears. If necessary, you can always jump over the side to reach Coasties and safety.

(U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer Sherri Eng)

Quick bonus photo of the Coast Guard's own tall ship, the USCGC Eagle. Here are some fun facts for you: This 295-foot sailing vessel was commissioned by the Nazis, ridden on by Adolf Hitler, and originally named for the man who wrote the Nazi Party anthem.