Well, you took the leap and signed on the dotted line. Now you're standing in your underwear in front of your bed at boot camp holding a camouflage bag in front of your face and some dude is screaming his head off at you. The thought that's probably running through your head sounds a lot like, "this is nothing like what my recruiter sold me on." Well, it's their job is to get you in — what did you expect?

You might go through the rest of your career believing that some dude in a cool-looking uniform lied to you during an otherwise innocent visit to your local shopping mall. And you know what? If this were any other decade, a time before the internet was easily accessible by anyone, you might actually have a believable story.

But in 2018, that just doesn't fly. Your recruiter didn't lie to you; you just didn't do the research.

If you've signed up, you've got no excuse for failing to know the following:


1. If you match your branch of service

Not everyone is cut out to join the Marines; it's a rough-and-tumble lifestyle that requires you to forsake most creature comforts. In fact, you may find that the branch that best suits you isn't one you were considering at all.

If you're unsure of what you want out of the military to even the slightest degree, consider each branch carefully. Next, consider the next item on this list.

Just make sure it's the best fit for you, either way.

2. If you match your MOS

This is a big deal. A lot of people join the military and sign up for an MOS they've never even heard of because it "sounds cool" only to realize that it's not at all what it it sounds like (looking at you, 1179 Water Dogs). Granted, some people end up liking their job, even if doesn't match the title — but those who end being miserable are a detriment to the unit.

If want to join the Marines to purify water, more power to you...

(U.S. Marine Corps photo Cpl. Kyle N. Runnels)

3. The fitness requirements are (usually) demanding

If you've got a big brain but don't like running a lot, join the Air Force. Rumor has it they only run in boot camp (and from the sound of gunfire, usually back into their air-conditioned buildings). If you want to join the Marines, but have a hard time doing push-ups, you'll learn — but it will not be a fun experience.

Air Force PT in a nutshell.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Charles Haymond)

4. Boot camp and basic training suck

Marines call it boot camp because, well, you wear boots and you're at camp (not the fun kind). The other branches call it basic training. Not only will you experience vary across branches, the amount of time you'll spend there will, too. The "easier" branches go for 9 weeks at most and the toughest (and, in my non-biased opinion, most handsome) branch goes for 13.

So, maybe you should decide on how long you want to get yelled at before you sign up.

(U.S. Marine photo by Lance Cpl. Angelica I. Annastas)

5. Real-life experiences may vary

It may do you some good to ask about the experiences of friends or family members who've served and don't look back on it with rose-tinted glasses. If your uncle's tales seem a little too far-fetched, rummage around on Reddit and other online communities to get an idea of peoples' general experiences in the branch you're considering. The facts are out there if you look.

This may be the thing that changes your mind more than anything.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jeremy D. Wolff)

6. Recruitment tactics are tactical

Before you set foot into the recruiting office, keep this in mind: Recruiters are essentially the salespeople of the military. They're not going to outright lie to you, but they're trying to sell you on the service they represent.

The fact of the matter is that you should be able to recognize the tactics they'll use to try and get you to sign up. Treat it like you would any other big decision. If the person you talk to is echoing things you've found in your research, they're probably being honest.

If you don't do the research and you feel like you got screwed — that's on you.

(U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Duane Duimstra)