MIGHTY CULTURE

Vodka made from Chernobyl grain is just what your party needs

The horrifying events of the 1986 Chernobyl disaster have once again caught the world's attention thanks to the recent HBO miniseries and subsequent Russian propaganda campaign, but films aren't the only thing creeping out of what locals call the "exclusion zone" these days.


Now, thanks to one unusual group of scientists and researchers with priorities a guy like me can respect, there's also Atomik Vodka: an artisanal booze concocted using ingredients harvested from inside the radioactive fallout-ridden territory surrounding Chernobyl.

Hopefully that burning in your throat isn't cancer.

(Chernobyl Spirit Company)

After studying the amount of radiation that transfers from soil to crops within the Chernobyl exclusion zone, the team from the Chernobyl Spirit Company set about planting their own rye crops in the vast abandoned fields near the city of Pripyat, Ukraine (close to where the Chernobyl plant was located). They then watered their crops with irradiated water sourced from an aquifer that is also within the radiation exclusion zone.

Once the crops were ready for harvest, the team used the rye to make their new vodka, and even doubled down on its radioactive reputation by using pure water sourced from "below the town of Chernobyl about 10 km south of the nuclear power station" to dilute the vodka down to 40% alcohol, according to their website.

Once finished, the vodka is reportedly no more radioactive than the plastic bottle of Military Special we all acted like we weren't taking swigs out of in the barracks when the First Sergeant came strolling around.

The boar depicted on the label was actually spotted living in the exclusion zone.

(Chernobyl Spirit Company)

"The laboratories of The Ukrainian Hydrometeorological Institute and the University of Southampton GAU-Radioanalytical could find no trace of Chernobyl radioactivity in ATOMIK grain spirit," their website claims.

Just to be safe, they also went ahead and sent their new booze to the Southhampton University in the U.K. for further testing. They also confirmed that radiation levels were well below safety limits (as even the Chernobyl Spirit Company acknowledges that tiny levels of radioactivity can be found in many common products).

The novelty of this vodka also comes with some good intentions. Part of the idea behind Atomik Vodka is finding new ways to invigorate the economy in the communities that surround Chernobyl. Of the many concerns facing these communities, radiation isn't really among them.

The Chernobyl Spirit Company includes this image of a "self settler" in her home in the Chernobyl area on their website explaining their process.

(Chernobyl Spirit Company)

"There are radiation hotspots [in the exclusion zone] but for the most part contamination is lower than you'd find in other parts of the world with relatively high natural background radiation," Explains James Smith, a University of Portsmouth environmental scientist and founding member of the Chernobyl Spirit Company.

"The problem for most people who live there is they don't have the proper diet, good health services, jobs or investment."

Smith and his colleagues don't imagine that the novelty of their vodka will make them rich. In fact, with plans to produce just 500 bottles per year, Smith says that he's hoping the company pays well enough to make the business into a healthy "part-time job," with an emphasis remaining on finding ways to bolster the standard of living for those residing in the region surrounding Chernobyl.

"Because now," Prof Smith adds, "after 30 years, I think the most important thing in the area is actually economic development, not the radioactivity."