MIGHTY CULTURE

4 reasons why grunts should read books

If they can read, that is.

So, you joined the grunts. From this day forward, everyone will make fun of you because some of your friends eat crayons and the others eat rocks. You, however, have never tasted the sweet nectar of Tide Pods and you're out to break the mold. You're on a mission to change the common perception that grunts' brains are about as meaningful as Certificates of Appreciation.

So, how can you do it? How can a grunt convince another person that they're actually intelligent and informed on the philosophies of the war-fighting profession? Easy: Read books.

We know, we know — you'd rather be getting drunk, but what are you going to do when you're sitting in a burning-hot, metal tube for ITX? Or when you're stuck on ship? We're not tell you to take a book to the armory line with you, but you know damn-well there's plenty of downtime to fill. These are the major reasons you should be reading, grunt.


1. To get better at your job

Reading a good book, especially one from the Commandant's Reading List, can help you learn new concepts and ideas that are relevant to your job in one way or another. Even if it's not The Art of War, reading military-themed novels can help put you in the right mindset to perform at a higher level.

Being good at your job is imperative.

(U.S. Marine Corps)

2. To learn from history

Those who don't learn from the past are doomed to repeat it. So, why not read up on past failures and get a sense of things you can do differently?

You can learn quite a bit from the mistakes of the past.

(U.S. Marine Corps)

3. To learn leadership skills

All the greatest military leaders read books. If you think that our Lord and savior, General Mattis (blessed be his name), spent his whole career playing Battlefield and drinking Natty Lights, you're sadly mistaken. No doubt he read plenty of books.

He probably read a new book every week.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo Cpl. Zachary Dyer)

4. To get better at articulating thoughts

When you eventually find yourself in a position where you have to write a five paragraph order (you know, a battle plan), being able to communicate your thoughts clearly in writing is of utmost importance. Reading the greats will help expand your threshold of written expression.

Plus, if you decide to push far and beyond the first four years, you don't want to become that Staff NCO who can't make it through the first paragraph of a promotion warrant or award certificate.

If you sound like Adam Sandler in Waterboy, your life will be difficult.

(U.S. Army)