It's easy to complain about training for a sh*t deployment to Okinawa, Japan, when there's an active war going on that you would rather be fighting in. Realistically, training exists for a reason. If there wasn't a solid reason for it, you'd go straight from boot camp graduation to combat, but, after centuries of warfare all over the world, we've learned a thing or two.

We get it. You didn't join the military in the post-9/11 era just to be sent to some stable country in East Asia, but you knew the deal when you signed the contract: Where you go and what you do when you get there is officially no longer your choice after you set foot on those yellow footprints.

But just because there's a war going on doesn't mean your "peacetime" training is pointless or worthless. Here's why:


1. So you don't get complacent

It's been famously said — complacency kills. If you get too used to training against a fictional enemy to the point of no longer putting forth effort, you're just going to start performing that way. If you're slacking when real bullets are flying, there's a good chance you'll f**k things up.

Just cause you use fake rifles now doesn't mean you'll be doing it that way forever.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brendan Mullin)

2. So you're prepared for the next real mission

You don't train like you fight, you fight like you train. If you train like sh*t, you're going to fight like sh*t. If you take every training event as seriously as real combat, your unit will be better off for it.

You don't want to be the unit that goes to combat only to get whooped by the enemy.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Darien J. Bjorndal)

3. So you can learn from your mistakes the easy way

If you step on a simulated IED, you won't lose your limbs — but you'll sure-as-hell remember the mistakes you made that led you there. This is a little bit easier than waking up in a hospital room wondering what you could've done differently.

Depending on where you're at and what you're doing, chances are a mistake in training won't get someone killed.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pfc. Christian Ayers)

4. So you can prepare the next generation 

Even if you never go to combat while you're in, you'll still be responsible for training the FNGs as they fill the ranks. But here's the thing — they're going to stick around long after you're gone and they're going to train the guys after them. This cycle continues until, eventually, someone goes to war — and they'll have generations of experience at their backs.

Train your boots like their life depends on it.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Dylan Chagnon)

5. So you can prepare other countries

If you get the opportunity to train with another country, keep in mind that they might be using the knowledge they gain from you on a combat mission in the near future. You can teach them to be just as lethal on the battlefield as you are and they'll get the chance to prove it.

Those Korean Marines just might experience some real sh*t after you leave.

(U.S. Marine Corps)