Military Life

Here are the best military photos for the week of March 16th

Life in the military is unpredictable. There's no way for service members to know what will happen on a day-to-day basis. Luckily, the ranks are filled with photographers who stand ready to capture everyday life, both in training and at war.


Here are the best photos from across the military this week:

Air Force:

Crew chiefs from the 317th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas wait for take-off Mar. 12, 2018 at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. Team Little Rock hosted over 65 Airmen from six wings to train together and showcase tactical airlift. Partnerships and interoperability enhance operational effectiveness and mission readiness.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Dana J. Cable)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Christine M. Pepin, a crew chief with the 177th Fighter Wing, New Jersey Air National Guard, performs a cursory inspection prior to hot pit refueling of an F-16C Fighting Falcon at the Air Dominance Center in Savannah, Georgia, March 13, 2018. The 177th FW participated in an air-to-air training exercise to sharpen air combat capabilities and accomplish multiple training upgrades.

(U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Airman Cristina J. Allen)

Army:

The U.S. Army Military Advisor Training Academy of the 316th Cavalry Brigade at Fort Benning conducts a field training exercise at Lee Field, March 14. The three-day exercise is the culmination of a four-week program designed to prepare Soldiers to conduct key leader engagements, exercise defense plans with local leadership and foreign forces, and grow the skills necessary to develop report with local populations. The U.S. Army MATA trains, educates, and develops professional Soldiers within the Security Forces Assistance Brigades.

(Photo by Patrick A. Albright)

A combat engineer assigned to Regimental Engineer Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment, pulls security as the Soldiers press forward to clear a trench during a live fire exercise at a range near the Bemowo Piskie Training Area, Poland, March 13, 2018. These Soldiers are part of the unique, multinational battle group comprised of U.S., U.K., Croatian and Romanian soldiers who serve with the Polish 15th Mechanized Brigade as a deterrence force in northeast Poland in support of NATO's Enhanced Forward Presence.

(U.S. Army photo by Spc. Andrew McNeil)

Navy:

An explosive ordnance disposal technician assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group (EODGRU) 2 prepares to rappel during helicopter rope suspension technique (HRST) training at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story. EODGRU 2 is headquartered at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story and oversees Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2 and all east coast based EOD mobile Units.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles Oki)

An MH-60S Sea Hawk, assigned to the Indians of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 6, readies for takeoff on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). Theodore Roosevelt and its carrier strike group are deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of maritime security operations to reassure allies and partners and preserve the freedom of navigation and the free flow of commerce in the region.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex Corona)

Marine Corps:

U.S. Marines with Charlie Battery, 1st Battalion, 10th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division fire an M777A2 155mm howitzer during the 10th Marines Top Gun Competition for Rolling Thunder at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Mar. 15, 2018. The Marines were evaluated on their timely and accurate fire support capabilities and overall combat effectiveness.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Nghia Tran)

A Marine assigned to Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) fires his M4 carbine rifle during a routine deck shoot aboard the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock USS New York (LPD 21) March 14, 2018. Marines conducted the training to maintain their combat skills and proficiency while deployed to the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations. U.S. 6th Fleet, headquartered in Naples, Italy, conducts the full spectrum of joint and naval operations, often in concert with allied and interagency partners, in order to advance U.S. national interests and security and stability in Europe and Africa.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Juan A. Soto-Delgado)

Coast Guard:

A Coast Guard boat crewmember aboard a 45-foot Response Boat-Medium, from Station St. Petersburg, Florida, assists two adults and three children Monday, March 12, 2018, from their disabled 18-foot pontoon boat 1 mile south of the Gandy Boat Ramp, Florida.

(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Aaron Massey)

Members of Astoria Emergency Medical Service surround an injured female hiker at Coast Guard Sector Columbia River in Warrenton, Ore., prior to transporting her to Columbia Memorial Hospital for further medical care, Mar. 11, 2018.The hiker was hoisted from Saddle Mountain by a sector MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew, which consisted of Lt. Cmdr. James Gibson, Lt. Jason Weeks, Petty Officer 3rd Class Ali Dowell and Petty Officer 1st Class Jason Yelvington.

(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Jason Weeks.)

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