Military Life

This is how the enemy camouflages its bombs

Being forward deployed to a combat zone means you're most likely fighting an enemy with plenty of home field advantage and tons of thought-out hiding spots.


Ongoing bombings topple over buildings and collapse bridges, and new structures replace the destroyed ones all the time; therefore, the most current geographical satellite map you have could already be outdated.

Without a city permit office to register new construction, coalition forces fighting on the ground have to make due with intel they have on hand and do their absolute best to predict where and how the bad guys are going to strike next.

Related: How SAS commandos avoided ISIS capture in a vicious hand-to-hand fight

The fact is, knowing how and when the enemy plans on striking is a guessing game, but since history repeats itself, these are common places they have been known to plant their bombs — so keep an extra eye out.

IEDs in the ground

This is by far the most common way IEDs are utilized. These deadly explosives can be hidden quickly in the ground; some last for years before being fully detonated.

Pressure cookers, homemade pressure plates, and other conventional materials are used by enemy forces to make improvised explosive devices. (Source: Marines.mil)

Although finding them can be challenging, Allied forces use metal detectors to locate them and mine rollers that are designed to detonate the explosive on their terms.

IEDs in the ground are also commonly located by the "indicators" the enemy leaves behind so their people don't accidentally step on one. These signs come in forms like stacked rocks and disturbed soil.

In moving or parked vehicles

Known as a "V-BIED" or vehicle-born improvised explosive device, these are some nasty suckers and can hold a lot of explosive materials based on the vehicle's cargo area.

This method can do some significant damage.

Sometimes the vehicles just appear to be  broken down cars parked on the side of a road as a traveling Army or Marine foot patrol passes by. Other times, suicide bombers drive them right up to the front entrance of a military base.

Vehicle-born improvise explosive device rigged and ready to det.

In dead animals

This method works just like the V-BIED. The enemy has been known to hide a several few pounds of homemade explosives (HME) in the bellies of dead animals. The bigger the animal, the more explosive they can implant.

Looks innocent — but stay away.

In trees

Ground troops frequently look down when searching for explosives. These IEDs are typically placed high up in trees to combat the turret gunners in an elevated position while in their armor vehicles.

The turret gunner has no real defense; they rely on their eyesight and instinct when traveling down a road in between large trees.

The local kids

Troops often carry a dump pouch used to quickly store spent magazines and others items without having to spend precious time placing them back into their original locations.

The pouch is typically placed near a troop's hip and is wide open for easy dumping access. Local kids have been known to innocently approach foot patrols and put live grenades into these pouches.

This doesn't happen too often.

The quick access dump pouch. (Source: Blue Force Gear)

Also Read: These Afghan moms are taking up arms to fight the Taliban and ISIS

Under potential souvenirs

Grunts love to pick up and pocket war memorabilia from time to time. But be careful because some items could be rigged to blow.

What are you picking up a stuffed bunny for anyway? It's creepy. (Source: Warner Bros. /Giphy images)

Under dead humans

It's gross, but it happens.

Just like the war memorabilia, once you turn over or pick up the dead body, you could be in for a deadly surprise.

Can you think of any others? Comment below.