Often, there comes a point when people decide to give their Facebook friends list an overhaul.

They completely change their social landscape online by avoiding accepting friend requests from certain types of people, and they give their current friends list a good, hard scrub.

Everyone has their reasons. Maybe they're doing it for security purposes, or because a handful of people's posts drive them crazy or they want to keep a more professional profile. Military spouses in particular might do so because they want to focus on positive, stress-free relationships – that is, the ones that bring wine, wear sweat pants, and check judgment at the door.


If you're a military spouse considering an overhaul, these 10 characters are some of the folks who might not make the cut…

1. The Gossip

At first, reading The Gossip's witty quips about annoying moms at Starbucks or fashion faux pas might be hilarious. Scrolling through The Gossip's posts could be an easy way to burn an hour outside baseball practice… until you find yourself the subject of one of The Gossip's posts.

For The Gossip, everything is fair game. When people listen to The Gossip, or "like" or comment on The Gossip's posts, the rumor mill churns. And every milspouse knows that the rumor mill is pretty damaging – especially if you live on base. So, if you receive a friend request from The Gossip, think twice before clicking "Accept."

2. The Negative Nancy

Sometimes we might like seeing The Negative Nancy in our feed. If we're already down, her critical gaze on life's horizon validates our own low feelings. But this is dangerous – beware! The more you read her negative posts, the more you'll feel negative, depressed and weary. In fact, research shows that negative thoughts and emotions can reduce your brain's ability to function effectively and even weaken your immune system.

That is the LAST thing you need when you're holding down the home front during a deployment or a long TDY! Do yourself a favor: if The Negative Nancy's posts are breeding the blues in your life, make the call: hit "Unfriend," lift your chin up, and notice the sun rising on the horizon.

3. The Stranger

The Stranger piques your interest. Coming out of nowhere, The Stranger has something in common with you and might need help. Maybe The Stranger claims to be stationed at the same installation and needs help finding counseling for marital troubles. Since your profile says you work at Family Advocacy, The Stranger thinks you can help…

At this point, revert to every OPSEC (Operational Security) commercial you've ever seen and don't respond (and tighten up your profile privacy). The Stranger is up to nothing but finding out military-related information or stealing money; you don't want to take part in either one of those nightmares!

And, don't be so sure that this scenario is far-fetched. A woman in Pensacola impersonated a military wife to trick service members and spouses into giving her money for supposedly sick children. It could happen on Facebook, too, and if it does, tuck your sympathy away and save it for a real friend who truly needs it.

4. The Selfie Addict

The Selfie Addict manages to capture herself (okay, or himself) in the most attractive poses, accentuating her most beautiful features, against the most impressive landscapes. And remarkably, she captures said images ALL. THE. TIME.

Looking through her series of carefully crafted selfies, you might start to believe (erroneously) that her whole life is perfect; worse, you might make comparisons to your own life and decide it's pretty dull. Research shows that these comparisons can chisel away at your self-esteem and it's all for nothing! Perfection is an illusion, after all. Hit "Unfriend," and focus on relationships that are real and meaningful instead.

5. The Soapboxer

The Soapboxer can't stop ranting. Whether it's something going on in the local community, the government, the war or the nation, The Soapboxer has an opinion and feels compelled to share the details. What's worse, if you post a comment that disagrees just a bit, The Soapboxer will drill into it and make you feel like complete mush for sharing your voice. There's no room for respectful debate here!

Much like Negative Nancy, The Soapboxer has a way of creating unnecessary stress and frustration. If that's what The Soapboxer is doing in your life, it's a signal to end your virtual relationship. After all, you've got a PCS to plan for, a deployment on the horizon, and a surprise visit from Murphy – there's no time to waste stressing over The Soapboxer.

6. The Ex

Friending The Ex might be tempting. Perhaps Facebook recommended The Ex in "People You May Know," so, out of curiosity, you skimmed unsecured photos and posts. And now you're inclined to send a friend request. We're all adults, so it couldn't hurt, right? Wrong!

Distance has a way of magnifying worries. If your service member is deployed or TDY for a long time, he or she doesn't need the added worry or stress of seeing The Ex's comments on your posts or photos. Even if you think the connection is totally harmless, think of your service member and nix the virtual friendship.

7. The Acquaintance

It's become common practice to meet someone briefly at a party or barbeque, only to find a friend request hours later. Regardless of whether or not The Acquaintance knows a friend of yours, pause before accepting the friend request.

Honestly, what do you really know about The Acquaintance? How will a Facebook relationship deepen your relationship? Odds are, it's only going to invite snooping – snooping from a person you barely know. Would you invite a mere acquaintance to come into your home and dig through your photo albums and drawers containing other personal information while you're not home? No? Didn't think so. Friending The Acquaintance on Facebook isn't much different. So, wait till you meet The Acquaintance a few more times before you are comfortable enough to leave him or her in your "home" unsupervised.

8. The Judge

If there's one thing military spouses know, it's that time is important. When our service members are about to deploy, all of our focus is directed at spending meaningful time with them. That usually comes at the expense of time spent with others, and it can mean declining invitations from close friends.

Most friends understand this, but The Judge does not. If you decline an invitation and later post a selfie of your family relaxing at home, The Judge might comment, "Looks like you weren't so busy after all." Or, if you opt out of a lunch date so that you can FaceTime with your deployed service member, only to post later that you're "feeling sad" because you never got to talk to him, The Judge will comment, "You should have just come to lunch!"

Military spouses are under enough pressure to hold down the home front, keep day-to-day operations running smoothly and support our service members who endure high-stakes careers; we don't need the added stress of feeling the need to please The Judge. Unfriend!

9. The Drama Queen

When you think of The Drama Queen, think of one word: Perception. Virtual relationships with The Drama Queen could reflect poorly on you, too, because her personal drama might end up appearing on your Facebook page. The Drama Queen might comment on your posts with inappropriate gifs or memes, tag you in photos that depict you in an unfavorable light, or write posts on your wall that are better suited for a private message or phone call.

Everyone else can see these posts, and they associate them with you and possibly your service member, as well. If that's not how you want to be perceived, then keep your Facebook feed Drama Queen-free.

10. The Boss

When you arrive at a new assignment, your service member's commander and commander's spouse might offer a genuinely warm welcome. In some situations, their commander and commander's spouse might welcome you, too.

This is all well and good, and it's appropriate to accept their welcome kindly, but be sure to respect the professional line that exists between your service member and The Boss… and The Boss' Boss. Friending The Boss can cross the line of professionalism, inviting The Boss into your personal world and asking if you can enter his or hers. Generally, people need to maintain their personal space, so while it's perfectly fine to enjoy friendly conversation at unit barbeques, allow everyone some breathing room on Facebook.

Who would you add to this list?

This article originally appeared on Military Spouse. Follow @MilSpouseMag on Twitter.