MIGHTY TRENDING

6 infantry tasks we hope to never see in video games

(U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Isabelo Tabanguil)

Let's be honest with ourselves, if video games were to depict the average day for a grunt, they would be boring. Even if they showed field training, there are still a lot more tedious things going on than shooting guns and blowing things up. The reality is that in the modern era, military video games like Call of Duty or Battlefield lied to everyone about military life.

If you joined because you thought it would be fun based on a video game, you might feel robbed. You probably cleaned more floors than battlefields and you probably sprayed more window cleaner than bullets. Infantry life isn't as exciting as you thought, is it?

There's definitely a lot you do outside of combat that you hope will never make it into any video games because it does, it will be a terrible experience for everyone involved.


1. Digging fighting holes

Easily at the top of the list. Can you imagine paying $60 for a bad ass looking military shooter game just to end up spending half of it digging a hole to shoot from?

In real-life, it probably takes you ten hours because three hours in you discovered the world's biggest rock and you spent the last seven hours using a tiny shovel to cut through it like it's California in 1850 and you found some gold in that bad boy.

Digging the fighting holes will make you rage-quit.

(U.S Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. David Diggs)

2. Formation

If you think un-skippable tutorials are bad, just be glad you don't have to stand still for two hours waiting for your company Gunnery Sergeant try and figure out how to say, "To all who shall see these presents, greetings," as if it was written in Hebrew.

Press "F" to slightly bend your knees so you don't pass out.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jerrod Moore)

3. Standing-by

This is the life of a grunt: you spend most of your day sitting in your room waiting for someone to give you a task. Usually they end up telling you to clean something thirty minutes before you're supposed to be cut loose for the day. And it will take you until Midnight.

Funny enough, video games are just one of many things to do while you stand-by so what would you do in a video game that had this?

Spades Simulator 19?

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Jackson)

4. Weapon maintanence

To be fair, Far Cry 2 had a mechanic and you would have to clean your weapon periodically or it would jam on you. What we mean is going through a Call of Duty campaign and then the post-credit mission is to spend 14 hours at the armory cleaning everything because you just put the entirety of the Department of Defense's ammunition store through it in a single go.

Imagine this scenario as the loading screen between missions.

(U.S Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Patrick Osino)

5. Annual training

Would you pay $60 for a video game that forced you to spend at least 25% of your play time at the base theater listening to your chain of command lecture on different subjects that they're vaguely qualified to speak on? Maybe that could be a $9 downloadable content release that comes out after everyone stops playing it.

Before you can even go on a mission, you would have to do this for an entire week.

(U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Cpl. Stormy Mendez)

6. Swim qualification

Part of the real-life tutorial is being taught survival swimming in boot camp but the military thinks after two years you'll forget so they make you do it again. It's like getting through that one water level you always hated (you know what we mean) just to do it again after a few missions.

Imagine if every update just erased your swim qual data.

(U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Gunnery Sgt. Robert Brown)