Widgets Magazine

9 of the biggest mistakes sailors make while at BUD/S

(Photo by MC2 Marcos T. Hernandez)

Navy SEAL candidates go through what's considered the hardest military training before earning their precious Trident. That training is called the Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL training, or BUD/S. When young men across the country join the Navy, they head down to the sandy beaches of Coronado, California to test themselves, both mentality and physicality, to see if they have what it takes to become a member of the Special Warfare community.

Since the BUD/S drop-out rate is so high (roughly 75% of candidates fail), many are left wondering what it takes to survive the rigorous program and graduate. Well, former Navy SEAL Jeff Nichols is here to break down a few of the mistakes that contribute to that high rate of failure.


1. Speaking with a recruiter before passing the physical screening test

According to Nichols, if you excel well beyond the required standard on physical fitness tests, you'll have a lot more sway in getting into the Spec Ops community. Your performance speaks volume in telling recruiters that this is what you want and that you're ready to move forward.

Not everyone is ready to take the plunge — show recruiters you have what it takes.

2. You train your strengths often, but ignore weaknesses

Most people train using methods that they're accustomed to, like swimming or bodybuilding. However, according to Nichols, Special Forces training is designed to expose a candidate's weaknesses. Locate those weaknesses and train them.

3. Training until failure too often

Many workout routines recommend pushing yourself until you're too physically exhausted to continue. Nichols suggests that you add a few training days into your routine during which you focus on perfecting technique instead of exhausting yourself.

4. Malnutrition

Nichols notes that, far too often, people either eat too little or too much of the wrong thing. To properly prepare yourself for training and recovery, you'll need to give your body the nutritional tools it needs.

Picky eaters are in for a big surprise as the Navy isn't know for a vast selection of cuisine.

Eating healthy is a solid idea.

5. Training to be sleep deprived

Being sleep deprived is extremely debilitating. Many of those who plan to take a shot at earning the Trident will try and train themselves to be sleep deprived. Don't do this.

Sleep deprivation is a difficult thing to endure. The best way to get through is to make sure your body is in top physical shape — which requires that you get as much rest as possible between training sessions.

6. Most candidates aren't ready to run in boots

Nichols recommends that you learn how to run in boots. Start with comfortable tennis shoes, then work your way up. This will lower your chances of developing shin splints during the real thing.

7. Overtraining yourself

Many candidates over-train themselves, aiming to be "run-dominant" and avoiding taking on mass, thinking that hypertrophy (bodybuilding) will make them slow. You can be muscular and still maintain great run times. Remember, Usain Bolt weighs over 200 pounds.

8. Candidates don't do enough fin work

You can be a solid swimmer, but once you put on those fins, the physical equation changes. Putting fins on your feet amplifies the stress your legs have to endure in the water.

So, get those fins on and start practicing.

9. Listening to SEALSWCC.com

We realize that telling you not to listen to the website might sound controversial, but Nichols finds a lot of the information listed there is wrong.