This WWII veteran played a song for the sniper trying to kill him

Just two weeks after American forces landed at Normandy on D-Day, Jack Leroy Tueller, one of those Americans, was taking sniper fire with the rest of his unit. Tueller played the sniper a beautiful song from his trumpet.

He was orphaned at age five, but before World War II, Jack Tueller would play first-chair trumpet in the Brigham Young University orchestra. After going to war as a pilot, his trumpet skills would serve him well, along with at least one German soldier and both their families.

Jack Tueller served in the Army Air Forces in the European Theater, flying more than 100 combat missions in a P-47 Thunderbolt. He earned the Silver Star and the Distinguished Flying Cross, among others. After the war, he became a missilier in the newly-formed U.S. Air Force and would serve in Korea and Vietnam as well. But his most memorable military moment would always be a night in Normandy when the power of music risked — and saved — his life.

It was a dark, rainy night in Northern France when then-Capt. Tueller decided to play his trumpet for everyone within earshot. The only problem was that not everyone in the area would be very receptive to a song in the dead of night — especially not the sniper trying to shoot him dead.

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These are 6 of the most unforgettable military movie tracks

Hollywood has always found a way to connect music with visuals. This seamless blending is an art that has constantly evolved alongside filmmaking.

Legends by likes of James Cameron and Martin Scorsese have used hit songs like "Bad to the Bone" in Terminator 2: Judgement Day and "Stardust" in Casino to enhance the audiences' experiences and bring their films to life.

Recently, a young director by the name of Edgar Wright has changed cinema with his revolutionary take on how to perfectly mold film editing with one's favorite tune in Baby Driver.

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Entertainment

The real reason Jimi Hendrix got kicked out of the Army

Jimi Hendrix is undoubtedly one of the greatest guitarists to ever step on stage. The man who headlined 1969's Woodstock Festival was responsible for defining American rock as we know it. But when he was a young, dumb kid, he was given the choice of going to war or going to jail — he chose the Army.

He served for just 13 months before being discharged, leaving many to speculate (and start rumors about) how and why he didn't fulfill his original 3-year contract. Well, we think this rock legend (who is also a constant talking point in 101st Airborne trivia) doesn't deserve to have his name dragged through the mud. Let's dive a little deeper.

If we can't clear up the misconceptions about him, at least we can get his Wikipedia article corrected. (National Archives)

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Articles

7 songs that will impress your unit at karaoke night

If you spend any time at all in the military after passing basic training, chances are good that you're going to end up in a bar with members of your unit. Chances are very good that one of those evenings will involve karaoke.

Karaoke doesn't care if you're a good singer or a bad singer (although the people subjected to your voice might have an opinion). Karaoke just needs your active and (hopefully) positive participation. Remember, even if you suck, you still had the intestinal fortitude to get up on a stage before a crowd full of drunken strangers — and that's a victory of its own.

What that crowd is most likely to judge you on is your choice of song. If you get up in front of your coworkers and sing "I Touch Myself" at the top of your lungs, you will never, ever live it down. In fact, you might as well change your name and go into hiding.

songs to impress your unit cable guy My name wasn't "Stilwell" until I attempted a Bjork song after three shots of Cabo Wabo.

Your audience will forgive a lot, especially your coworkers and battle buddies, as long as you don't make it too difficult to forgive. So, make sure you get up on that stage with energy and good humor. Have a good time and the audience will have one with you.

Before we begin, let's go over a few ground rules. First, if you're with your unit, remember that you'll likely have to see these same people every day for the next four-to-six years — but never forget to read your audience. If you're in a bar where everyone keeps rapping Dr. Dre and they're really good at it, maybe save your rendition of "Friends In Low Places" for a more receptive crowd.

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Articles

A 'silent service' vet will front the military's biggest music festival

Josh Anchondo started his adult life in the Navy, specifically Kings Bay, Georgia. Now, he's self-styled luxury-events emcee known as DJ Supreme1 and his work takes him to the party hotspots of South Florida and Las Vegas. But he loves to give back to groups like Toys For Tots, Susan G. Komen, and the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.

This time, he's playing for his second family: the U.S. military.

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Articles

This is the real Sgt. Pepper from the Beatles album cover

Long story short, the 20th Century's most widely-known British non-commissioned officer was real. Only his name wasn't Pepper, it was Babington. And he was a Lieutenant General.

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Articles

The dad in ‘The Sound of Music’ was a hardcore naval combat veteran

In the 1965 film The Sound of Music, Captain von Trapp ran a tight ship at home. He also ran a tight ship at sea, commanding two U-Boats for the Austro-Hungarian Empire during World War I. By the war's end, he was the most decorated naval officer in Austria-Hungary.

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That time Elvis' combat training took down Alice Cooper

It's a well-known fact that the King of Rock n' Roll enjoyed practicing karate. What might not be so well-known is that he was pretty good at it, too. After starting his training while in the Army in Europe in 1958, Elvis Presley studied martial arts until his death in 1977 — when he was a seventh-degree black belt.

This talent came in handy one night when rocker Alice Cooper pulled a gun on him.

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MUSIC

This is the Air Force vet who will kick off USAA's free music festival

Miami-based DJ and Air Force veteran Rodrigo Arana – AKA DJ KA5 – is cooking up something special for his featured guest appearance in the USAA Lounge at BaseFEST this weekend. But don't expect him to just cue up a list of Top 40 hits and fire them off, one after another. He approaches deejaying the way a trained specialist approaches a mission: he plans, he prepares, he drills, and then, when he's got you captive on the dance floor, he executes.

Result: the beat drops and you lose your mind.

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