History

How 'Hail to the Chief' became the Presidential anthem

The song that many of us identify uniquely with the President of the United States has a surprisingly controversial history. Chester Arthur hated it, Ronald Reagan thought it was a necessary tradition for the office, and President Trump enters a room to Lee Greenwood's God Bless the USA more often than not. But this essential piece of Presidential entrance music is almost as old as America itself.

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MUSIC

This vet rocked BaseFEST in front of thousands of his Marine brothers

On September 22nd, thousands of fans poured into Lance Corporal Torrey Gray Field at Twentynine Palms, California for the final stop on USAA's months-long BaseFEST tour. The all-day festivals brought together the military community at the country's largest bases and offered free food, fun, and some great, live music — featuring larger-than-life bands, like The Offspring.

But veterans got in on the entertaining, too. Marines, troops, and their families were warmed up by Twentynine Palms' own Matt Monaco, better known by his stage name, Modest Monaco.

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MUSIC

'In the Navy' was almost an official Navy recruiting song

At some point in your life (especially if you've ever been in the Navy), you've heard Village People's 1979 disco classic, "In The Navy." Whatever you know about the group and this song, know these two things: First, their characters are supposed to be the ultimate, macho, American men. Second, the Navy asked the band to use this song as the Navy's official recruiting song.

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5 of the best musical instruments to go to war with

Musical instruments have been going to war since humans started gathering large armies — I don't have an exact date, but I can tell you it was a long, long time ago. But humans have advanced to the point where we no longer require war drums. Instead, one guy from a unit brings a guitar on deployment and plays the same three goddamn power chords for eight months.

Just remember, it could always be worse.

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MUSIC

Soldiers and 'Dear John' letters inspired this classic Jim Croce song

Jody works behind the scenes and inspires a folk rock song.

In 1972, Jim Croce released "Operator (That's Not The Way It Feels)," a song about a one-sided conversation with a telephone operator. The singer is trying to find an old flame who seems to have run off to Los Angeles on a tryst with his old friend. The caller expresses his disbelief at being betrayed by someone he once trusted. It's an all-too-common story, especially among those serving in the military — Jody ran off with the singer's girl.

In fact, Jody is exactly what inspired Croce to write the song, except it wasn't about his old flame, it was about everybody else's on the base where he was stationed, back in the days when a phone call cost a dime.

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MUSIC

How a sailor remembered 250 prisoners of war through song

Douglas Hegdahl walked freely around the infamous "Hanoi Hilton" prison camp, one of many American prisoners of war held there in 1967. He was sweeping the courtyards during the prison guards' afternoon "siesta." The American sailor that fell into their laps was known to the guards as "The Incredibly Stupid One." They believed he could neither read nor write and could barely even see. But the "stupid" Seaman Apprentice Hegdahl was slowly collecting intelligence, gathering prisoner data, and even sabotaging the enemy.

He even knew the prison's location inside Hanoi.

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History

This British crew sang a hilarious song as their ship burned

People who serve in the military tend to develop a pretty dark sense of humor. It comes with the territory. When a very large part of your life involves risking it for your country and for the guy next to you, the idea that your last moments could be closer than you think never fully leaves your mind.

This can change a person. Veterans have a different outlook on some of the more serious aspects of life, laughing at things many others would never dream to, for fear of offending others or, worse, tempting fate. For the crew of the British destroyer HMS Sheffield during the Falklands War, this change became readily apparent and their darker sense of humor flourished.

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MUSIC

The unexpected history of the hilarious 'Spirit of 76' meme

The historic piece of art that's featured in the hilarious meme showcasing three marching Revolutionary War musicians has a long, long history. While it might not date as far back as the Revolutionary War, it shouldn't come as a surprise to anyone to learn it was inspired by and modeled after drunken American war veterans.

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MUSIC

Why Godsmack was used in Navy recruitment ads is kinda awesome

You couldn't turn on your television in the mid-2000s without seeing one of the adrenaline-pumping recruitment ads created by the United States Navy. Keith David's majestic yet empowering voice tells you that being a civilian is overrated and that life in the Navy is freakin' badass — a message delivered atop a crushing guitar riff from Godsmack's Awake.

Keith David signed on because, despite having never served, he's an avid supporter of the military and veteran community. In fact, many of his most well-known roles are of him portraying troops across many different branches.

Godsmack, on the other hand, got on board because someone asked politely.

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