Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY FIT

Why this Navy veteran with TBI is set to run for 12 full hours

Like many post-9/11 veterans. Amanda Burrill is all about physical fitness. She's very conscious of what food she eats, she makes sure to get enough sleep, and she's very, very active. She has to be — this is how she beats TBI every day of her life. Now, the Navy officer who nearly had to relearn how to walk is set to run — for her fellow veterans, that is.

As a young Navy officer on a deployment, Burrill slipped in a sewage leak and lost consciousness. Soon after, she began to have memory problems. When she went to get it checked out, she was diagnosed with Traumatic Brain Injury. But that didn't deter her — she spent a total of eight years in the Navy. After leaving the service, she became an advocate for veterans suffering from TBI, but first, she became an amazing example for them to follow.


She spent two years in surgeries, rehabs, and therapies. She spent a great deal of time studying as well, attending Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism and becoming a trained chef at the famed Le Cordon Bleu. She even studied wine in Paris. Next, she started running. She runs marathons and Iron Man triathlons on top of competing in fitness competitions. Now, she's a writer and on-air talent for the Travel Channel and uses that fame to advocate for anyone who is suffering from TBI.

But she's not finished running. She's just running for her fellow veterans now.

In September, 2018, Amanda Burrill will run in the Relay for Heroes, benefiting the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund. Endurance athletes from all over the world will converge on New York City's Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum to follow a route along the banks of New York City's Hudson River. The goal isn't 26.2 miles or any number of miles — the goal is to run as many miles as possible during the 12-hour race.

If you're there, you just might see Amanda Buriill, the Navy rescue swimmer who climbed Denali after her TBI diagnosis, running for the first time since 2015.

"We summited Denali unguided!" Burrill told WATM. "I'm an avid, record-breaking mountaineer; not despite my injuries but because of them. The mountaineering interest started while I was in brain injury rehab, as I needed a fun hobby to replace my first and true love: running."

After her injury, Burrill's balance and gait were poor and it affected her running ability. Doing marathons and Ironman races with busted form "messed her up," as she says. She now has a metal shank foot, full of screws, that's been opened lengthwise five times.

"Mountaineering is more about suffering well than having stable feet," she says."I WILL OUT-SUFFER ANYONE. Knowing that in my heart is pretty damn awesome."

She is running to highlight female veterans, TBI awareness, and resiliency. From firsthand experience, she believes female vets are underserved when it comes to TBI treatment and believes self-advocacy is an essential element in furthering the cause of women getting the help they need — even if that just means receiving a diagnosis.

"I hope to raise awareness — and money — and bond with my teammates in a show of Lady Vet solidarity," she says.

The Relay for Heroes will start on Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018, in New York City. The starting line can be found at West 46th Street & 12th Avenue, New York, NY 10036. You can run as an individual or in 4-6 person teams. For more information or to register, visit the Relay for Heroes website. If you're unable to run or support a runner, you can still donate to Burrill's Relay for Heroes team here.