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The 10 worst armies in the world 2018

Wars should be like taking off Band-Aids: If a country can't get it over with fast, maybe it shouldn't think about shedding blood. When a country is this bad at war, it probably runs the risk of just slowly bleeding to death. There are many, many examples of this in both history and in today's newspapers — and we've collected our favorite examples. This episode of "Fixer Upper: Armed Forces Edition" has seen a lot of changes since 2015.


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Since the last list of the world's worst armed forces, Iraq turned the whole "losing half the country" thing around and started showing up for work, so its army is probably a little better now — and that meant it was time for a new list of the World's Worst.

There are also a few new faces on this updated list. When considering this year's candidates, I actually created some criteria. It was important to consider what the armed forces of a country needs versus what it has and what a country's priorities really are. I also considered how much sh*t the country (or its leadership) talk versus what it actually accomplishes.

Some things never change, though. Like North Korea's pride in a jet from 1964.

But keep in mind this is not about criticizing the people who fight wars on the front lines. For the most part, it's about criticizing the governments and policymakers who fund, train, and equip these armies and then expect them not to get annihilated once they go into battle.

There are many countries with extremely substandard defense forces, but most of those aren't going around rattling sabers, either. For example, Gambia has about 2,000 troops with old weapons and uniforms that don't match, but they spend most of their time fighting HIV and wizards, not threatening to invade Senegal.

And though there are many armed forces engaged in fighting around the world, many of those aren't actually from a recognized country.

Stop trying to make an Islamic State happen. It's never gonna happen.

This year's list gave Mongolia a break for going the extra mile and having a Navy despite being totally landlocked. We also said goodbye to the Philippines. After the Manila Standard called our 2015 assessment of the Philippines' armed forces "spot on," incoming President Rodrigo Duterte decided to spend $6.6 billion upgrading the AFP. To be clear, no one here is taking credit for this.

No one should ever take credit for anything Duterte does. Seriously. Google it.

Also leaving this year's list is " Africa's North Korea," Eritrea. At the time of this writing, the country is looking to end its war with Ethiopia and maybe even stop "drafting" all of its men to work in forced labor. Also missing from the list is Somalia, whose armed forces is pretty much subsumed by U.S. special operations along with Kenyan and Ethiopian troops.

These are the forces that make the KISS Army seem even more formidable than they already do.

This was only a matter of time.(KISS Army)

10. Tajikstan

The latest hand-me-downs from Russia to the Armed Forces of the Republic of Tajikistan include two classes of helicopter from the 1960s, tanks from the 1970s, and personnel carriers from the 1980s. This is still a big step up from the absolutely nothing they got from the fall of the Soviet Union. That's just the equipment. It doesn't get much better for the troops on the ground in an army where even the doctors will haze them to death. If the hazing doesn't get them, the disease, hunger, or terrible conditions might. This is why no one wants to join the Tajikistan army... except when they're kidnapped and forced to go.

But congrats to the Tajik armed forces, which celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2018. This is only weird because independent Tajikistan is 27 years old.

Good to know those old Soviet ushankas found a home.

9. Russia

Many might be surprised to see Russia on a "worst armies" list, but the country's biggest wins of the last few years include:

  • Not starting World War III in Syria.
  • Air strikes on poorly-armed Syrian rebels.
  • Fighting Ukraine to a draw.
  • Building a Navy it can't crew.
  • Annexing a peninsula with no electricity, fresh water, or money.
  • Hypersonic missiles that fly only 22 miles.
  • Finally building a robot tank after 30 years and failing at it.
Russia seems strong because it doesn't let anyone tell it what to do. But all it wants to do is beat up on its weaker neighbors and generally be an asshole to Washington — and this is the source of its true power. It can fight a war. It can conquer countries.
But that all depends on who it fights. Just look what happened when Russian "mercenaries" accidentally fought a professional army in Syria.

Spoiler: They died.

Why does the brick have to be on fire, comrades? I'm not sure that adds anything to the experience.

8. Turkey

President Erdoğan is a lot more aggressive with Turkey's armed forces than he used to be, both in use of force and imprisoning generals he thinks started a coup against him in 2016. That's what dictators do. But as ISIS fighters approached the Turkish border with Syria, Turkey did very little about it. Erdoğan only cared about consolidating power, (something he finally did with the most recent election) while Turkey's longtime enemy, the Kurds, cleared ISIS from the area.

Fast-forward to when Turkey did act in Syria, months after the U.S.-backed Kurdish fighters defeated ISIS in northern Syria. Turkey invaded and immediately started attacking – you guessed it – the Kurds. Turkey has always had a reason to hate Kurds, but it's poor timing to exercise those demons on a de facto ally in the middle of a war they were winning to help protect Turkey.

The only goal of the Turkish invasion is to keep the Kurds from getting their own country, the ultimate geopolitical dick move.

Yay, you did it. After everyone else did it first.

7. Nigeria

If you thought it was bad that Nigerian military members were fired for making a strategic retreat or that Nigerian troops could only run away from Boko Haram because neither their weapons nor vehicles worked, remember: it can always be worse. Especially for Nigerian women.

After escaping the terror of living under Boko Haram and being "liberated" by Nigerian troops, women can now expect to be exploited for sex by Nigeria's military. Their troops can also be almost as bad as Boko Haram itself.

As for the troops' welfare, senators are more likely to have armored cars than front-line troops. And when the country did decide to invest $2 billion into its military, it was immediately funneled into personal bank accounts of government ministers – to the tune of $2.2 billion, more than the original investment.

Some Nigerian army officers actually sell their weapons and ammo to Boko Haram.

6. Afghanistan

First of all, let's understand that the U.S. is never, ever going to leave Afghanistan — ever. If we really planned to leave Afghanistan, we'd give them something more effective than old prop planes and uniforms we don't want. When U.S. troops do give the ANA reasonably modern equipment, the ANA turns right around and deserts them in the next Taliban attack. So the U.S. then has to go destroy their own Humvees. And while some call the Afghan Air Force a win for U.S. training, they should remember that when the Taliban get its hands on those planes and laser-guided munitions and the U.S. has to blow those up, too.

Most of the funding for the ANA goes toward salaries, essentially begging ANA troops not to kill their fellow troops or NATO allies. This is a game the ANA can't win when the Taliban is offering three times as much to do the opposite. So, even though the ANA called the 60mm mortar a "game changer" for ground troops, the Taliban will still pay a king's ransom for them to fire it into a friendly base. The United States has sunk $80 billion into an Army that can't win — or even fight. Hell, they pass basic training just by not going AWOL.

To top it all off, the older generals are being forced to retire from the Afghan Army. Remember what happened the last time the U.S. pushed to fire a whole big chunk of another nation's army? The Iraq War and, eventually, ISIS.

"Congratulations on graduating from Not Going AWOL 101, soldiers."

(U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Kevin P. Bell)

5. Venezuela

The number one PT score for Venezuela's army is probably in running, because that's all they've been doing lately. When a Venezuelan soldier's choices are limited to either working for free and potentially starving to death or to desert entirely, the choice becomes clear.

So, what does an embattled President do when his army starts crumbling? Tell civilians the U.S. is going to attack and then show them how to defend the country.

Which is exactly what Venezuela's military did. Cool.

"And now it's ready to fire, abuela."

4. Mexico

Mexico militarized its law enforcement then sent its military into Mexico to fight of violent drug cartels... and still lost. The country was divided into five security zones and then invaded by the armed forces. Then they become just as corrupt and criminal as the local law enforcement they replaced.

To make matters worse, when the army takes out any kind of cartel leadership, it creates a power vacuum and then a war among the cartels. The strategy of removing high-level kingpins has resulted in a 60-percent increase in violence that the Mexican military can't control, despite fully occupying its own country. They've been at this since 2006 and it's taken a heavy toll on the Mexican military and Mexican people. In the last few years, Mexico quietly became the second deadliest conflict, surpassed only by Syria.

That means you're actually safer in Kabul than in Cabo.

"Mexico: At least we aren't Syria."

3. North Korea

Of course North Korea makes the list again. Despite the recent Singapore Summit, there is no one better at rattling a saber than a North Korean named Kim. In fact, Kim Jong Un is really just following the North Korean game plan to get concessions from the United States:

  1. Create a scene
  2. Threaten all-out war with the South
  3. Get talked down at the last minute
  4. Get rewarded for not starting the war you had no intention of starting in the first place.
But to make step two seem plausible, North Korea needs to have a credible threat. So while it does have hundreds of artillery pieces pointed at Seoul, a city with 9.8 million people, it also has the world's oldest air force and trains its pilots using the power of imagination, mostly because it can't afford jet fuel. Its navy is just considered a "nuisance" and we would all be amazed if its army had enough food for the time it takes to actually kill those 9.8 million people.

No one ever did that to Saddam either.

2. Syria

Syria's armed forces are so awful, they can't win a civil war with the help of Russia, Iran, Hezbollah and the U.S. and Kurds fighting ISIS for them. In fact, anyone can feel free to violate Syria's sovereignty. Turkey, the GCC, Europe, and Israel are doing it without repercussions on an almost daily basis. So, naturally, what do Syria's armed forces do? Threaten to attack the U.S. and Israel. As if they didn't have enough problems.

And when they do win, it's not exactly clean. Chemical weapons, cluster munitions, and starvation are the primary tactics used for the now-seven year long civil war there. It's not exactly the way to convince the civilian population that Assad is the right leader for them. Seven years down, five to go.

Do they get issued photos of Bashar al-Assad?

1. Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia talks a lot of smack about a war with Iran but even when it brings its full military might to bear, it can't keep a coalition together, let alone finish off an Iranian proxy. They've been fighting the Houthi-led insurgents in Yemen since 2015 and with the help of half of Yemen, all of Sudan, Morocco, the U.S., the UAE, Senegal, France, Egypt, Jordan, and Bahrain, they still fail to win the war.

This coalition has every numerical and technological advantage on sea, land, and air and they're just being manhandled, the result of overconfidence and a dash of hubris. The Saudis thought 150,000 battle-hardened Houthis would just roll over after a few airstrikes. "Winning" was the extent of their plan and, if it didn't work for Charlie Sheen, it sure as hell isn't going to work for Saudi Arabia.

Not only have they failed to win after three years and heavily outnumbering and outgunning the Houthis, they've lost coalition partners and turned the entire country into a humanitarian disaster. That's what you get for relying on another country's military to bail you out of everything for 20 years.

What $80 billion a year buys you.