About 75 paratroopers from the US Army's 82nd Airborne Division and 40 personnel from US Army South spent the final days of January in Colombia, working with Colombian troops for an airborne assault exercise.


The exercise, which took place between January 23 and January 29, saw US and Colombian troops conduct airborne insertion from US and Colombian C-130 Hercules aircraft and then carry out exercises simulating the capture of an airfield.

A video recorded by one paratrooper during a static-line jump allows you to go along for the ride.

The exercise allowed US and Colombian personnel to work together and exchange strategic and tactical expertise, US Southern Command, which oversees military operations in the region, said in a release announcing the exercise.

You can see some of what they got up to in the photos below.

Colombia is one of the US's closest partners in the region, and the two countries' militaries have worked together closely for decades. The US has also provided billions in aid to Colombia under Plan Colombia and, later, the so-called Peace Colombia.

US 82nd Airborne Division paratroopers Colombian soldiers from 2nd Special Forces Battalion during a dynamic force exercise in Tolemaida, Colombia, January 24, 2020.

US Army/Master Sgt. Alexander Burnett

Colombia has made achieved significant reductions in violence, but Plan Colombia has been criticized for leading to abuses by the military and human-rights violations and for being ineffective against drug production and trafficking. Peace Colombia has been criticized as too focused on military aid.

"We are honored to train with Colombia — a close friend of the US and Global Partner to NATO," US Navy Adm. Craig Faller, head of Southern Command, said in the release. "This airborne exercise demonstrates the interoperability, lethality and professionalism of our militaries."

US Army 82nd Airborne Division paratroopers and Colombian soldiers conduct airborne assault training at Tolemaida Air Base in Colombia, January 26, 2020.

US Army/Spc. Edward Randolph

The exercise was done at Tolemaida air base in Cundinamarca department, southwest of Bogota in central Colombia. But it comes amid a period of heightened tension with Venezuela, which has contentions relations with Colombia, especially along their shared border to the east

US Army 82nd Airborne Division paratroopers and Colombia soldiers during airborne assault training at Tolemaida Air Base in Colombia, January 26, 2020.

US Army/Spc. Edward Randolph

The US has increased pressure on Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro's government, while Colombia has been grappling with the brunt of the millions of Venezuelans who've fled their country due to political violence, widespread shortages, and eroding law and order.

US Army 82nd Airborne Division paratroopers conduct an airborne exercise with Colombian soldiers at Tolemaida Air Base in Colombia, January 23, 2020.

US Army/Spc. Edward Randolph

Read more about the Venezuelan exodus and Colombia's effort to deal with it.

Faller has underscored the importance of partnerships for improving security in the region.

US 82nd Airborne Division paratroopers watch Colombian paratroopers descend in Tolemaida, January 23, 2020.

US Army/Master Sgt. Alexander Burnett

At a press briefing in Florida on January 23, Faller pointed to Venezuela as a "safe haven" and "base of opportunity" for dissident members of the demobilized FARC rebel group, as well as guerrillas from the ELN rebel group and "terrorists groups" involved in narco-trafficking.

US 82nd Airborne Division paratroopers and Colombian soldiers conduct an exercise simulating the securing of an airfield at Tolemaida Air Base, January 25, 2020.

US Army/Sgt. Andrea Salgado-Rivera

Source: US Defense Department

"The best way to deter or defeat any of these threats is with these partnerships," Faller said. "Their capacity and ours helps both secure the US and partners."

An 82nd Airborne Division Artillery medic and a Colombian army medic treat a simulated casualty during an exercise in Colombia, January 25, 2020.

US Army/Master Sgt. Alexander Burnett

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