A Boeing 757 was hacked and the Department of Homeland Security is concerned

The increasing use of electronics and internet connectivity in transportation vehicles is a double-edged sword. While new technology gives drivers and pilots more information and makes communication easier, it also leaves vehicles more vulnerable to cyber attacks.

The Department of Homeland Security illustrated that fact when it remotely hacked into a Boeing 757 through its radio communication system at an airport in Atlantic City, NJ, according to CSO. While the hack occurred in September 2016, it wasn’t revealed until DHS official Robert Hickey gave his keynote address at an aerospace security summit on Nov. 8.

American Boeing 757 flight deck. (Image Wiki)

American Boeing 757 flight deck.

Though the exact details of how he and his team managed to hack into the plane are classified, Hickey indicated that no one on his team was in physical contact with the aircraft or used any materials that would be flagged by security. Boeing insists that the hack was limited to the aircraft’s communication system and did not reach any of the controls or software that could alter its flight path.

“We witnessed the test and can say unequivocally that there was no hack of the airplane’s flight control systems,” the company told the Daily Beast.

Also Read: The vulnerability of US Navy ships to computer hacking is scarier than you’d think

Still, this is alarming news for the aviation industry. The Department of Homeland Security and Transportation Security Administration have been aggressive in trying to prevent passengers from boarding aircraft with items that could put other passengers at risk, but if it becomes possible to control a plane’s communication and flight capabilities from the ground, their existing security infrastructure may need a significant update.

TOP ARTICLES
How a Christmas-gift-to-be turned into a booming vet-owned business

Looking for the perfect gift for the salty veteran in your life and fast running out of ideas? Put those 72 koozies down and check out Medals of America.

This wounded warrior is turning steel into gold in Alabama

Colin Wayne went from an Army National Guardsman to a fitness model to...a steel worker? Wayne’s company, Redline Steel, creates art from steel.

3 leadership lessons that will take you from the battlefield to the boardroom

Col. Ted Studdard never imagined he'd have a 25-year career in the Marines, but he's got some pro tips to share now that he's a bonafide "mustang."

How a soldier went to war with his unique brand of Cuban-style cigars

Blanco Cigar, a company built and run by a first generation American with Cuban roots, has its ups and downs, but generated over a million dollars in 2017.

6 crazy things actually found in boot camp amnesty boxes

Upon arriving at boot camp, the staff gives newbies a chance to toss prohibited items into the "amnesty box." Want to know what's inside?

Why your next battle buddy might be a robot armed with a railgun

The Army has quite a Christmas wishlist for Uncle Sam Claus, and it's filled with all kinds of goodies like robots, light tanks, and lasers.

Here's why some Corpsmen are considered Marines, and some aren't

A sailor earning respect from a Marine is a tough challenge. It's a special privilege to have a Marine tell you happy birthday each Nov. 10.

Here are the changes to the combat uniform the Army is testing right now

The Army will be testing new uniforms and boots beginning in 2018, better suited for hotter environments. Here's what's different about them.

The Navy will pump out more attack subs to counter Russia and China

The Navy had previously decided to slow production of Virginia-Class submarines, but has now decided to produce more in order to keep up with rivals.

So, parts of our helicopters are falling on children now

A window fell out of a CH-53E as it flew over an elementary school in Okinawa, Japan. One child sustained a minor injury from debris caused by the window.