MIGHTY TRENDING
C. Todd Lopez

Army's 1st SFAB unit returns from Afghanistan says advisor mission a 'success'

(Photo by Sean Kimmons)

The 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade deployed in March 2018 to Afghanistan to carry out the inaugural mission for the newly-created SFAB concept. The brigade returned in November 2018, and leaders say their experience there has proven successful what the Army hoped to accomplish with the new kind of training unit.

Army Brig. Gen. Scott Jackson, 1st SFAB commander, spoke May 8, 2019, at the Pentagon as part of an Army Current Operations Engagement Tour. He said the Army's concept for the new unit — one earmarked exclusively for advise and assist missions — was spot on.

During their nine-month deployment to Afghanistan, Jackson said the 800-person brigade ran 58 advisory teams and partnered with more than 30 Afghan battalions, 15 brigades, multiple regional training centers, a corps headquarters and a capital division headquarters.


"That's nearly half of the Afghan National Army," he said. "I believe we could only accomplish our mission and reach these milestones and validate the effectiveness of an SFAB because the Army got it right — the Army issued us the right equipment, and provided us the right training to be successful. But most importantly, we selected the people for this mission . . . the key to our success is the talented, adaptable, and experienced volunteers who served in this brigade."

Lessons learned

Jackson outlined two key lessons learned from the unit's time in Afghanistan. First, they learned their ability to affect change within those they advise and assist was greater than they thought.

Sgt. 1st Class Jeremiah Velez, center, an advisor with the 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade's 3rd Squadron, interacts with Afghan Command Sgt. Maj. Abdul Rahman Rangakhil, left, the senior enlisted leader of 1st Kandak, 4th Brigade, 203rd Corps, during a routine fly-to-advise mission at Forward Operating Base Altimur, Afghanistan, Sept. 19, 2018.

(Photo by Sean Kimmons)

"As our Afghan partners began to understand the value of 1st SFAB advisors, they asked us for more," Jackson said. "So our teams partnered with more and more Afghan units as the deployment progressed."

Another lesson, he said, was that persistent presence with partners pays off.

"Units with persistent partners made more progress in planning and conducting offensive operations and in integrating organic Afghan enablers like field artillery and the Afghan air force than unpersistent partnered units," Jackson said.

Those lessons and others were passed to the follow-on unit, the 2nd SFAB, as well as to the Security Force Assistance Command.

Another observation: the Afghan military is doing just fine. They're in charge of their own operations. And while U.S. presence can provide guidance when needed — and it is asked for — the Afghans were proving successful at doing their own security missions without U.S. soldiers running alongside them. It turns out that just having an SFAB advise and assist presence has emboldened Afghan security to success.

"We saw enormous offensive maneuver generated, and not just at the brigade level," said Army Lt. Col. Brain Ducote, commander of the 1st Battalion, 1st SFAB. "They weren't overdependent. They were able to execute offensive operations themselves. It was a huge confidence builder when we were sometimes just present. Even if we didn't support them, just us being there gave them the confidence to execute on independent offensive operations."

Confidence is contagious

Ducote said that the confidence moved from brigade level down to battalion, or "kandak" level. Commanders there also began running their own offensive operations, he said.

"They believe in themselves," the lieutenant colonel said. "The Afghan army has tremendous freedom of maneuver and access to areas where they want to go. If they put their mind to it and they say we're going to move to this area to clear it . . . they are good at it. And they can do it. Would they, given the choice, want advisors with them? Absolutely. Why not? But let there be no mistake: the Afghans are in the lead, and the Afghans can do this."

Advisors with the 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade's 3rd Squadron and their 3rd Infantry Division security element exit UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters during a routine fly-to-advise mission at Forward Operating Base Altimur, Afghanistan, Sept. 19, 2018.

(Photo by Sean Kimmons)

Ducote said Afghan success is evident by their expansion of the footprint they protect, such as in Kunar and Kapisa provinces, for instance.

"[There are] all sorts of provinces where they expanded their footprint and influence," he said. "And the people absolutely support their security forces."

Also a critical takeaway from Afghanistan and an indicator of the value of the SFAB mission there is the authenticity of relationships between SFAB advisors and Afghans.

Building real relationships

During their nine months in theater, the 1st SFAB lost two soldiers to insider threats. Army Capt. Gerard T. Spinney, team leader for 1st Battalion, 1st SFAB, said that what happened after the attacks revealed the strength and sincerity of the relationship between Afghan leadership and SFAB leadership.

Army Cpl. Joseph Maciel was working for Spinney in Tarin Kowt District, Afghanistan. He was killed there by an Afghan soldier in July 2018 — a "green on blue" threat.

"His sacrifice will never be forgotten," Spinney said. "But we still had to continue advising afterward. That day, my partner, a kandak commander . . . wanted to come see me."

Spinney said the Afghan soldier who had killed Maciel didn't belong to this commander — but that commander still wanted to meet with him.

Afghan soldiers listen to a map reading class taught by Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Davis, an advisor with 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade, Sept. 18, 2018.

(Photo by Sean Kimmons)

"He was very adamant coming to see me," Spinney said. "He was angry. He was embarrassed. He was determined to rid [his own] unit of anything like this. And it was sincere. During the deployment he lost many soldiers. I had to sit with him and almost echo the same sympathies. I think the relationship got stronger."

"You have to be there with them, good times and bad times, successes and failures," the captain said. "That's how you build trust, that's how you show you care. He was there for us that day. Our relationship survived. And I'd say from that point on he wanted to make us feel safer. From that point on we saw differences in security . . . they took care of us because they wanted us there."

Jackson said that insider threat might have derailed the 1st SFAB mission. In fact, he said, he suspects that was the intent of the enemy that carried out those threats. But it didn't happen that way, he said.

"It didn't derail the mission," Jackson said. "Despite a brief pause maybe, as we reassessed what happened and what we needed to do both on the Afghan side and the American side, in the end our relationship was stronger."

Ensuring success

The SFAB concept was first proposed by Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Mark A. Milley. And since then, Jackson said, the Army has put a lot of effort into ensuring the success of the SFAB mission. That includes, among other things, training, people and gear.

Ducote said the equipment provided to 1st SFAB was critical to its success in Afghanistan.

Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Davis, an advisor with 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade, teaches a map reading class to Afghan soldiers Sept. 18, 2018.

(Photo by Sean Kimmons)

"These teams are operating at distance, in austere environments," Ducote said. "In some cases without electricity. We need the right equipment to be able to extend the trust that we give to them, and the trust that we extend to them. We want that to be manifested through the right equipment — communications specifically."

He said the gear that proved essential to SFAB success included medical, communications and vehicles — and all were adequately provided for by the Army.

"The Army got it right what they gave us," Ducote said. "We were able to do that mission, at distance."

Home again

Back home now for six months, Jackson said the brigade is back to repairing equipment, replacing teammates and conducting individual and small-unit training to prepare for its next mission. He said their goal is to provide the Army a unit ready for the next deployment, though orders for that next mission have not yet come down.

The advise and assist mission is one the Army has done for years, but it's something the Army had previously done in an ad hoc fashion. Brigade combat teams, for instance, had in the past been tasked to send some of their own overseas as part of security transition teams or security force assistance teams to conduct training missions with foreign militaries. Sometimes, however, the manner in which these teams were created may not have consistently facilitated the highest quality of preparation.

Sgt. 1st Class Jeremiah Velez, an advisor with the 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade's 3rd Squadron, flies in a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter on his way to Forward Operating Base Altimur, Afghanistan, Sept. 19, 2018.

(Photo by Sean Kimmons)

The SFAB units, on the other hand, are exclusively designated to conduct advise and assist missions overseas. And they are extensively trained to conduct those missions before they go. Additionally, the new SFABs mean regular BCTs will no longer need to conduct advise and assist missions.

The Army plans to have one National Guard and five active-duty SFABs. The 1st SFAB stood up at Fort Benning, Georgia, in early 2018. The 2nd SFAB is based at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, but is now deployed to Afghanistan. The 3rd SFAB, based at Fort Hood, Texas, is now gearing up for its own first deployment. The 4th SFAB, based at Fort Carson, Colorado, is standing up, as is the 54th SFAB, a National Guard unit that will be spread across six states. The 5th SFAB, to be based at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, is still being planned.

"As subsequent SFABs come online, it creates a huge capacity for the rest of the combatant commands in the world," Jackson said. "I would be confident to say that there are assessments ongoing to see where else you could apply SFABs besides Afghanistan."

This article originally appeared on United States Army. Follow @USArmy on Twitter.