MIGHTY TRENDING

It Sure Looks Like Cats Can Contract COVID-19

Dogs aren't off the hook either.

Cameron LeBlanc

A Belgian housecat may be the first feline with a confirmed case of COVID-19, joining the more than 800,000 humans around the world who have contracted the disease to date.

Belgium's Federal Public Service announced that the cat's owner contracted the disease after a trip to Northern Italy, one of the most infected regions in the world. About a week after the onset of their human's symptoms, the cat followed suit, with diarrhea, vomiting, and respiratory issues. Poor kitty.


Tests conducted at a veterinary school in Liège on vomit and feces samples from the cat confirmed the vet's suspicions: High levels of the SARS-CoV-2 novel coronavirus were found. Blood tests will be conducted once the feline exits quarantine and antibodies specific to the virus are expected to be found.

When COVID-19 first hit our shores, many media outlets (ahem, New York Times) were quick to jump on the fact that the virus was not yet shown to infect dogs. This has proven untrue — two dogs in Hong Kong were infected — and is beside the point. Dogs are not a primary vector for the disease, but if their owner is infected, they can certainly pass on the virus. This is why experts advise steering clear of strange dogs when you're on solitary walks no matter how friendly they are.

Still, the experts don't seem too panicked about this development.

"We think the cat is a side victim of the ongoing epidemic in humans and does not play a significant role in the propagation of the virus," Steven Van Gucht, virologist and federal spokesperson for the coronavirus epidemic in Belgium, told Live Science.

That's good news for the humans of the earth, especially the cat people. The good news for the felines of the earth is that the cat in question recovered from the virus after just nine days with all nine of its lives intact.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.