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Here are the unhelpful tips the Coast Guard gave to help get through the furlough

Times are tough right now for the Coasties. Since they're essential personnel, they have to work but, apparently, they're not essential enough to get paid during this government shutdown. They got lucky with the December 31st paycheck, but things aren't looking so good for the mid-January paycheck.

Missing even a single paycheck is going to cause massive ripples that will unceremoniously toss many of them into unnecessary debt. This is a serious problem for our brothers and sisters who serve in the Coast Guard, and there's no amount of "nice words" that can smooth over the pain they're feeling — only paying their rent can do that.

To make matters even more awkward, the Coast Guard officially put out a five-page sheet on how to "help" their troops. It has since been rescinded and taken down, probably because it felt a lot like putting salt on the wounds.


Now, in defense of the author of that five-pager, it does have some good (albeit basic) information that could help the furloughed Coasties. Step one details that should the mid-month paycheck get missed, their first line supervisor will discuss possible options for getting through the resulting sh*tty situation. Chances are, the leaders will understand that this is far above anyone's control and won't hold them back from taking reduced days.

Offering "reduced days" implies that the Coast Guard is expecting troops to make ends meet through alternative measures — as indicated by step four on the document, which was "supplement your income."

Literally the first thing (in step four) it suggests is to hold a garage sale. Honestly, though, the logistics of throwing a garage sale often cost you more money than you make. If you were already planning on getting rid of that old TV sitting in the guest room, by all means, go for it. But if you're selling your beloved Xbox for quick cash only to buy the exact same thing later on, you're throwing money down the drain. Think ahead is all I'm saying.

Plus, I think most people use social media or websites to sell old stuff nowadays, so you might get a better deal there instead of spending your weekend in the driveway.

(Photo by Bob N. Renee)

The rest of the document goes into detail about learning about your personal situation and how to manage your debt. It also says you should avoid using credit to supplement your income. That's fantastic advice but, realistically, it's a rule that may have to be broken.

Do not go out and get a credit card to make up for all the wasteful spending you'd normally do. Do not use credit to run up a bar tab because you're short on actual cash. That's a terrible idea regardless of the furlough.

The fact is, however, that children need to be fed and heating bills still need to be paid. A credit card may help in that moment, but use them with extreme caution and don't forget to pay it back when this blows over.

I recommend staying close to the CGX.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Rebecca Amber)

The document offers up, as a final option, bankruptcy. For the love of Uncle Sam, do not go into bankruptcy on a whim because of a momentary, terrible situation. There will be a light at the end of this tunnel.

There are organizations out there that can help. Don't ever feel like you've been thrown to the wolves. The military is a giant family, and we look after our own. Ask for help if you need it and help others if you don't.

For a complete look at the "Managing Furlough" document, check it out below.

Managing Furlough by on Scribd