MIGHTY TRENDING

The Coast Guard disrupted this year's 4/20 with a multimillion-dollar drug bust

And 5 other interesting stories from this week in the military world.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Brandon Murray/ Coast Guard

The only constant in the military world is chaos. No two weeks are alike, and you've got to roll with the punches — but that doesn't mean you need to roll blindly. Each week, we put together a collection of the most interesting stories to come from the military world, and we put them here for your learning pleasure.

Here's what you missed while you were busy watching all of your civilian friends 4/20 Instagram stories.


1. The coast guard unloads $62.5 million dollars worth of drugs

Crew-members with the interdicted drugs at Port Everglades, FA

(US Coast Guard photo by Brandon Murray)

The U.S. Coast Guard unloaded literal tons of cocaine and marijuana at Florida's Port Everglades. The haul has a whopping $62.5 million dollar estimated street value (also known as "the weekly budget for Charlie Sheen"). The drugs were seized in international waters somewhere in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The haul includes seven tons of marijuana and 1.83 tons of cocaine.

Officials say the operation involved two Coast Guard cutters and a Navy ship off the coasts of Mexico and Central and South America.

2. The Pentagon is investing in space robots to repair satellites

The U.S. has more than 400 satellites orbiting the earth at any given time. They have commercial, military, and government uses—but when something goes wrong, they have no use at all, and fixing them can be insanely difficult.

However, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) believe space robots could be a viable long-term solution for repairing the ever-growing number of satellites. The program is scheduled to last roughly five years.

3. MLB executives and USAF personnel swap leadership tips and experiences

Washington Nationals execs team up with military personnel

Jessica Cicchetto/U.S. Air Force

Higher-ups from the Washington Nationals and Air Force personnel met up for the 2nd annual "Nats on Base" conference to discuss leadership similarities between the two organizations. The gathering was during the "2019 Air Force District of Washington's Squadron Command and Spouse Orientation Course."

During the panel, 40 new commanders and their spouses focused on leadership methods with representatives from the Washington Nationals and Washington Redskins.

No word on whether or not USAF leadership learned how to lose the most prolific baseball talent to the Philadelphia Phillies.

4. Air Force toying with the idea of two-piece flight suits for all pilots and aircrew

The current one-piece flight suit

(U.S. Air Force/Staff Sgt. Dallas Edwards)

The USAF seems to change uniforms more than any other branch. Much like a sorority girl before a night out — they are now deciding between going with the tried-and-true one piece or an exciting, new two-piece. Only these are made to withstand more than a spilled vodka cranberry.

The benefits of the two-piece flight suit are, supposedly, ease of bathroom use and "improved overall comfort." So far, initial feedback has been positive. The Army is also considering more distant plans of adopting a two-piece suit.

5. Cost of new ICBMs are rising: why the Air Force isn't concerned

photo by Senior Airman Ian Dudley/ USAF

Next generation intercontinental ballistic missiles are expected to rise in price soon, but the Air Force is unconcerned about this short term price hop. Gen. Timothy Ray expects the total estimated cost to drop after the Air Force makes a decision on which competitor—Boeing or Northrop Grumman—will be able to offer the best price.

Ray continued on to state, "Between the acquisition and the deal that we have from a competitive environment, from our ability to drive sustainment, the value proposition that I'm looking at is a two-thirds reduction in the number of times we have to go and open the site."

The Ground Based Strategic Deterrent Program will reuse much of the infrastructure where the missiles are housed, as well as invest in those facilities—effectively giving the Air Force the ability to maintain new missiles easily and less expensively over time. "Our estimates are in the billions of savings over the lifespan of the weapon, based on the insights," Ray said.

6. Army scraps plans to demo next-gen unmanned aircraft

Defense News

The Army's plans to demonstrate the capabilities and designs for a next-generation unmanned aircraft have been abandoned. The decision was made in favor of two future manned helicopter procurement programs, according to the head of the Army's Combat Capabilities Development Command's Aviation and Missile Center's Aviation Development Directorate.

With current plans to build a future attack reconnaissance aircraft and a future long-range assault aircraft, Layne Merritt told Defense News, "another major acquisition is probably too much for the Army at one time."