Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Tuesday announced the platform would allow its users to turn off political ads.

"Everyone wants to see politicians held accountable for what they say — and I know many people want us to moderate and remove more of their content," Zuckerberg wrote in a USA Today op-ed article. "For those of you who've already made up your minds and just want the election to be over, we hear you — so we're also introducing the ability to turn off seeing political ads."

"We'll still remind you to vote," he added.


Facebook will begin implementing the feature for some users Wednesday and plans to make it available to all users over the next several weeks, a company representative told CNBC.

Users will be able to turn off ads about political, social, and electoral issues from political candidates, super PACs, and other organizations that have a political disclaimer indicating an ad is "paid for by" a certain entity, CNBC reported.

Zuckerberg also announced in his op-ed article that Facebook would seek to boost voter registration, voter turnout, and marginalized voices ahead of the 2020 presidential election and that the platform hoped to help 4 million people register to vote.

To that end, he said Facebook would create a Voting Information Center with information about registration, early voting, and voting by mail. The center will also include details on how and when to vote, Zuckerberg said, adding that the company expected 160 million people in the US to see "authoritative information on Facebook about how to vote in the general election from July through November."

Zuckerberg also said Facebook would continue working to combat foreign interference on its platform by tracking and taking down "malicious accounts."

The company removed 3.3. billion fake accounts in 2018 and 5.4 billion last year as of November.

Zuckerberg's announcement comes as Facebook continues facing scrutiny over its decision to show political content to users even if that content contains misinformation or false claims.

The social-media network has been under the microscope particularly in the past few weeks after it refused to follow Twitter's lead in flagging President Donald Trump's misleading statements on its platform.

Shortly after Twitter shared links debunking two of Trump's tweets spreading conspiracy theories about voting by mail, Zuckerberg criticized Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey in a Fox News interview.

"I just believe strongly that Facebook shouldn't be the arbiter of truth of everything that people say online," he said.

Dorsey hit back at Zuckerberg, tweeting: "We'll continue to point out incorrect or disputed information about elections globally. And we will admit to and own any mistakes we make."

He added: "This does not make us an 'arbiter of truth.' Our intention is to connect the dots of conflicting statements and show the information in dispute so people can judge for themselves. More transparency from us is critical so folks can clearly see the why behind our actions."

Zuckerberg appeared to allude to the recent strife over Trump's tweets in his op-ed article, writing, "Everyone wants to see politicians held accountable for what they say — and I know many people want us to moderate and remove more of their content."

"We have rules against speech that will cause imminent physical harm or suppress voting, and no one is exempt from them," he wrote. "But accountability only works if we can see what those seeking our votes are saying, even if we viscerally dislike what they say."

Zuckerberg added that he believes the best way to hold politicians accountable is through voting.

"I believe we should trust voters to make judgments for themselves," he wrote. "That's why I think we should maintain as open a platform as possible, accompanied by ambitious efforts to boost voter participation."

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.