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MIGHTY TRENDING
Ryan Pickrell

Iran warns US aircraft carrier is a 'target,' not a 'threat'

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Adam Randolph)

As US troops and weaponry pour into the Middle East to counter Iran with threats of "unrelenting force," Iran warns that US forces are "targets," not threats.

A little over a week ago, the White House, following approval from the Pentagon, announced that the USS Abraham Lincoln carrier strike group and a bomber task force composed of B-52 Stratofortress heavy, long-range bombers were being immediately deployed to US Central Command as a warning to Iran, which the US believed might be planning an attack on US interests.


The Pentagon announced May 10, 2019, that additional assets, including an amphibious assault vessel and an air-and-missile defense battery, were also being sent into the region. The US has said that it will respond to any Iranian attack with "unrelenting force."

A U.S. Air Force B-52H Stratofortress aircraft assigned to the 20th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron taxis for takeoff on a runway at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, May 12, 2019.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ashley Gardner)

Iranian military leadership pushed back over the weekend.

On May 11, 2019, Yadollah Javani, the deputy head of political affairs of Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, said that the US "wouldn't dare to launch military action against us." His comments came shortly after Ayatollah Tabatabai-Nejad, a high-ranking cleric in the Iranian government, warned that US forces will face "dozens of missiles."

Another IRGC commander followed suit May 12, 2019.

"An aircraft carrier that has at least 40 to 50 planes on it and 6,000 forces gathered within it was a serious threat for us in the past," Amirali Hajizadeh said. "But, now it is a target."

"If (the Americans) make a move, we will hit them in the head," he added.

Ghadir-class submarine.

Iran's state media released an animated video back in February showing one of Iran's Ghadir-class submarines sinking an American aircraft carrier. Such an aggressive act, the success of which is far from guaranteed, would be a bold and dangerous move for Iran.

"The decision to go after an aircraft carrier, short of the deployment of nuclear weapons, is the decision that a foreign power would take with the most reticence," Bryan McGrath, an influential naval consultant, previously told Business Insider. "The other guy knows that if that is their target, the wrath of God will come down on them."

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.