NEWS

Now there's some doubt about whether Iran really tested a new long-range missile

The latest Iranian ballistic missile test, which was condemned by US President Donald Trump, never happened and the images that were released of the supposed test were actually taken more than seven months ago, Fox News reported Sept. 25.


The conservative cable news channel, citing as its sources two US officials who requested anonymity, said that the launch was "fake" and that Iran released video images of a failed missile launch that it conducted in late January.

Trump originally had reacted to the claimed launch on Twitter on Sept. 23 evening, saying, "Iran just test-fired a Ballistic Missile capable of reaching Israel. They are also working with North Korea. Not much of an agreement we have!"

Photo by Michael Vadon

When asked about the matter by EFE, a State Department official said that the US "is evaluating the reports" that Iran launched a ballistic missile Sept. 22 and refused to comment on "intelligence matters," including the authenticity of the launch.

CNN reported that a Trump administration official familiar with the latest US assessment of the supposed test said that US intelligence radars and sensors "picked up no indication" of any Iranian missile launch.

So far, it would seem, the Iranian reports of the "successful" missile test do not appear to be true, the official added to CNN, saying "As far as we can see, it did not happen."

The "Khorramshahr" missile. Photo by Hossein Zohrevand via Tasnim News Agency.

Iran's English-language television channel Press TV broadcast a video Sept. 22 of the allegedly successful launch of a new medium-range ballistic missile called the Khorramshahr which, according to the Iranian military, has a range of 2,000 kilometers (about 1,250 miles) and is capable of carrying multiple warheads.

Trump said last week that he had made a decision on whether the US will continue to abide by - or withdraw from - the nuclear pact with Iran that put an end to 12 years of diplomatic conflict over Tehran's controversial nuclear program, but he has not yet revealed what that decision is.

In his speech before the United Nations General Assembly almost a week ago, Trump declared the nuclear pact to be an "embarrassment" that his government could withdraw from if it suspects that Iran was using the accord as a shield to ultimately be able to build a nuclear bomb.

United Nations General Assembly hall in New York, NY. Wikimedia Commons photo by user Avala.

"We cannot let a murderous regime continue these destabilizing activities while building dangerous missiles, and we cannot abide by an agreement if it provides cover for the eventual construction of a nuclear program," he said.

Regardless of whether the latest launch was faked or not, the US feels that the Iranian ballistic missile program and its "support for terrorism" constitute "provocative" behavior that undermines regional security, prosperity, and stability, the State Department officials told EFE.

"We will continue to carefully monitor these actions and we will use all the tools we have available to counter the threats of the Iranian missile program," one of the sources added.

According to experts, Iran is the Middle Eastern nation with the largest arsenal of ballistic missiles - more than 1,000 short- and medium-range rockets.

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