The formation of a sixth branch of the United States Armed Forces for a space domain is all but official now. After months of floating the idea through Washington, President Donald Trump directed the Pentagon and the Department of Defense to begin the process of creating what will be called, in his words, the "Space Force."

With all due respect — and believe me when I say I am in support of this endeavor — it should be called the "Space Corps," as was proposed by the House Armed Services Committee almost a year ago. This is entirely because of how the proposed branch will be structured.

The "Space Force" is said to fall underneath the Air Force as a subdivision. Its Pentagon-level leadership and funding will come directly from the Air Force until both the need and ability to put large amount of troops into the stars arises. The soon-to-be mission statement of the space branch will be to observe the satellites in orbit, unlike the hopes and dreams of many would-be enlisted astronauts. Essentially, this new branch will take over the things currently done by the Air Force Space Command.


Who already have the whole "giving recruits' false hopes of going into space" thing covered.

(Graphic by Senior Airman Laura Turner)

This would put them on the same footing as the Marine Corps, who receive their Pentagon-level leadership, funding, and directives from the Navy. The word "corps" comes from the Old French and Latin words cors and corpus, which mean body. In this context, it means it's a subdivision.

Corps is also found in the names of many of the Army's own branches, like the Signal Corps, the Medical Corps, and the Corps of Engineers. The most famous of these corps was the once Army Air Corps, which later became today's Air Force.

They earned the term "Force" — it wasn't just given to them because it sounds cool.

(National Archive)

At the very start of World War I, when aviation was just a few years old, all things airborne were handled by the Aviation Section of the Signal Corps. It was soon changed to the "Army Air Service" when it was able to stand on its own. It was again changed to the "Army Air Corps" between the World Wars.

When it blossomed into its own on the 20th of June, 1941, its name was changed to Army Air Forces — informally known as just the Air Force. The name stuck permanently when it became so far removed from the day-to-day operations of the Army that it needed to become an entirely new and completely distinct branch of the Armed Forces.

Many years down the road, such a "Space Force" may earn its name. Until it is no longer a subdivision of the Air Force, the name is etymologically incorrect.

Let's just say that the benchmark should be when they can actually reach space without the aid of the Air Force.

(Photo by Senior Airman Clayton Wear)