NEWS

The Navy wants to train sailors on a holodeck

Walking the show floor of the 2017 Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference, Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Bill Moran saw a lot of fast-developing technology that impressed him.


He didn't see the one thing he wants, even though it's a technology that first appeared in 1974, "where you walk into a room and you were in a virtual environment and you could do almost anything," Moran said Dec. 27 during a panel discussion at the conference, known by the acronym I/ITSEC.

Never mind that this virtual room made its debut on "Star Trek: The Animated Series."

The floor of the 2017 Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference in Orlando, which Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Bill Moran attended. (U.S. Navy courtesy photo)

"I want a holodeck," Moran said, referring to the room where Star Trek characters are able to interact with virtual, holographic environments, people and objects. "And we're kind of getting there. You put on some [virtual reality] goggles downstairs [on the show floor], I tried on a few of those, and since I was here a couple years ago, it is fascinating how quickly that is becoming a reality.

"Now, if we could just get rid of the goggles and just have a room."

Neither did Moran find what he asked industry leaders for two years ago at the 2015 I/ITSEC-a Conex shipping container where a trainee can walk inside and have training scenarios rendered on virtual reality panels.

"Torpedo room, engine room, bridge room," he said. "It knows when you were there last, it knows how effective you were, what you're performance levels were, how much experience you have, and it starts to test you."

"That same box could take a team-bridge team, combat team, maintenance team-that has to do a project together, and it could set up the scenario virtually," Moran continued. "That's the holodeck of the future, that's what we need. I challenged some folks in here two years ago, and everybody ran off and wanted to get there. I've only been on maybe 10 percent of that floor, but I haven't found a holodeck or the Conex box yet."

Still, despite the lack of holodecks or virtual-reality shipping containers, Moran was encouraged by the progress he did find on the floor of the convention.

Also Read: New virtual reality lets operators simulate jumps into combat

"It's just amazing how fast things are moving," he said.

Naval Aviation took "the baby step into this world of live-virtual-constructive" last year with the opening of the Air Defense Strike Group Facility at Naval Air Station Fallon, Nevada, said Rear Adm. Daniel Cheever, commander, Naval Aviation Warfighting Development Center.

The ADSGF currently houses integrated simulators for the F/A-18E-F Super Hornet, EA-18G Growler, E-2 Hawkeye and AEGIS air defense system but Cheever said it will eventually comprise all Navy aviation simulators, integrated and connected so that they can communicate securely with outside locations.

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