MIGHTY TRENDING

You can win a 2019 Tesla courtesy of Rob Riggle & friends

Big Slick is giving away a Tesla in support of Children's Mercy Kansas City.

If you haven't heard of Big Slick, it's a fundraiser designed to raise support for the cancer center at Children's Mercy, one of the nation's top pediatric medical centers. In 2010, U.S. Marine Rob Riggle teamed up with Paul Rudd and Jason Sudeikis to host a poker tournament, raising over $120,000 in their first event.

Since then, they've recruited more help and raised over $8 million through sponsorships, a live auction, and online fundraising campaigns like this one, hosted by Prizeo.

Here's how to win:


Win a Midnight Silver 2019 Tesla Model 3 plus “Junk in the Trunk”

For only a $10 donation in support of Children's Mercy Kansas City, you can win a Midnight Silver 2019 Tesla Model 3 with celebrity "junk in the trunk" (surprise goods from David Koechner, Eric Stonestreet, Rudd, Sudeikis, and Riggle himself).

The more money you donate, the more entries you get in the raffle.

And this isn't one of those things where you have to pay taxes on your new amazing car — it'll be delivered to your (CONUS) door with all sales tax and delivery fees covered.

Children's Mercy is a not-for-profit hospital that provides care for children from birth through the age of 21, giving comprehensive care to nearly 2,000 children each year with childhood cancers, sickle cell disease, hemophilia, and other blood disorders.

Did you expect anything less from Rob Riggle?

Also read: Rob Riggle to host 'InVETational' golf tourney to benefit Semper Fi Fund

Rob Riggle Is Golfing For Veterans

Let's not forget that the man also hosts an annual InVETational Golf Classic to raise thousands of dollars for critically wounded veterans and their families.

And this is in between shooting films like 12 Strong and hosting television shows like Holey Moley. The man knows how to work. I mean, he literally cleared 9/11 rubble by hand.

As reported in our conversation with Riggle, "for a week he worked 12-on-12-off, clearing the twisted wreckage that was piled six stories high around where the twin towers of the World Trade Center had proudly stood just days before. On the seventh day, the operation was changed from search-and-rescue to search-and-recovery. With all hope gone that more victims might be found alive among the concrete and steel and with the danger of more collapses gone, the heavy machinery was brought in to remove the rest."

So it's no surprise that in addition to working on his professional career as an entertainer, Riggle devotes his time to helping others.

Join in on the fight and donate to Children's Mercy. Who knows? You might just win an incredible new car!