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5 insane things about North Korea's legal system

Here in America, land of the free, when we hear news about North Korea, it further reinforces our desire to never step foot in the reclusive nation. All the negative press that comes from within the DPRK has us sure that it's the worst place to live — ever.

It has been run by Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un since 2012 and, under his rule and the regimes of his father and grandfather, many rules and regulations have been put in place to control the people that call the country home. Many countries around the world have laws that must be enforced — usually for good reason — but some of North Korea's laws seem to defy both reason and ethics.

To give you a little taste of the hermit kingdom's skewed sense of justice, we've compiled a list of some the most insane legal aspects of North Korea.


1. You need legal approval to live in the city

If you're rich and powerful, chances are you've already been approved to live in Pyongyang — the largest city in the country. If you're poor as f*ck, then good luck ever getting a taste of your nation's capital city. The government must approve of all the citizens seeking to call Pyongyang home.

Pyongyang, North Korea.

2. Weed is legal

We came across this shocker while doing our research. According to a few North Korean defectors, marijuana can be purchased at local markets and you can watch it grow in nearby fields. Who would've thought a country ruled by an authoritarian would permit such a thing?

3. Their hair cuts are regulated

North Korea isn't known for being fashion-forward. In fact, the people who reside in the strict country may only select from a number of predetermined hairstyles when it comes time to get a cut. It's said that the government only allows people to sport one of 28 different styles.

If you don't comply, you face serious penalties. That's right, people. North Korea has actual fashion police.

4. You must vote

In most countries, voting is a right. In North Korea, voting is mandatory. If you don't, you face severe punishment. Elections are held every five years and the same family always seems to win.

Seems legit...

5. Commit a crime, you and your family could do the time

In most countries, only those that commit the crime are punished. North Korea, however, goes a few steps further. To send the message that the country won't tolerate any lawbreakers, the government can imprison an offender's entire family for their actions.

In fact, they can send up to three generations of a family to the big house for a single crime.