Widgets Magazine

How these combat vets are getting back to their American roots

For many of us, one of the hardest parts of service is hanging up the uniform for the last time. After spending an entire career learning the ins-and-outs of war, you're being thrown into the lion's den that is the civilian workforce and, for once, you feel unprepared.

But veterans have tools that civilian employers are beginning to recognize: Our undying drive for success, a willingness to get our hands dirty, and a natural ability to lead.

And there's no better place to apply these skills than in the agricultural industry.


Watch the documentary below to see this group of veterans apply what they've learned in the military to the farming world, and see how this course can help change lives.

Tribeca Studios and Prudential Financial teamed up to create a documentary about a class of veterans who attend a six-week hydroponics training course through Archi's Institute for Sustainable Agriculture, or "Archi's Acres," a program accredited by the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.

In it, veterans from all corners of the country bond over their shared experiences, using what they've learned in service to create something from seemingly nothing.

"The journey back into civilian life can be incredibly challenging for many reasons," says Chuck Sevola, head of Veterans Initiatives at Prudential. "Innovative programs like this one provide consistent and focused support from people who understand the challenges that veterans face, which is critical to helping our servicemen and women find quality, purposeful work and peace of mind after their military service."

Spending time sowing, growing, and cultivating a harvest isn't just about learning a new skill, it can also help veterans who are going through post-traumatic stress.

"Archi's Acres is a path into becoming someone else, and something else, involved in something bigger and better than the combat we may have experienced. Being able to communicate that to other veterans that I see, who are maybe in a place of hurt, and showing them that there is another option — that can be life-changing. That's been instrumental in giving me a healthier outlook." says Jon Chandler, one of the course's beneficiaries.

(Tribeca Studios)