GAMING

This scrapped game could've been the most accurate portrayal of Fallujah

(Atomic Games)

Making a video game based on historical events often means navigating the fine line between creating an experience that's consistently engaging to the player without trivializing the gravity of the real event. This is especially true of military conflicts.

Battlefield 1's single player campaign did a terrific job of this, giving the player the warning of, "you are not expected to survive" before tossing them into the grim reality that is WWI trench warfare.


Other games, however, use the backdrop of the invasion of Normandy as yet another arena in which players can "360 No Scope" each other.

Then, you have Atomic Games' controversial Six Days in Fallujah, which was slated to be a highly accurate representation of what the 3rd Battalion, 1st Marines encountered in November, 2004, during the Second Battle of Fallujah. Shortly after it was announced to the public in 2009, it was dropped by its publisher and is now nothing more than a "what if" of gaming.

The developers at Atomic Games took their project very seriously. Every aspect of the game was created based on interviews with over 70 individuals, including the U.S. Marines who fought there, Iraqi civilians, war historians, senior military officials, and even former Iraqi insurgents.

The game was a far cry from typical first-person shooters that reward players for sprinting around the map, spraying bullets at the bad guys. Instead, it was said to have been more like a survival-horror game. Every minor decision made in the game would have lasting effects on player's experience. Additionally, the game was built on an astounding engine that allowed for a 100% destructible environment — bullet holes left in walls from a previous skirmish would exist into perpetuity.

The game's director, Juan Benito, told GamePro Magazine that giving players a taste of the horror, fear, and misery experienced by real-life Marines in the battle was a top priority.

"These are scary places, with scary things happening inside of them. In the game, you're plunging into the unknown, navigating through darkened interiors, and 'surprises' left by the insurgency. In most modern military shooters, the tendency is to turn the volume up to 11 and keep it there. Our game turns it up to 12 at times, but we dial it back down, too, so we can establish a cadence."

As much as I love the FPS genre, most games lack the raw emotional connection that Six Days in Fallujah promised to offer.

(Atomic Games)

In Six Days in Fallujah, you would've followed a young Marine who was attached to the 3/1 Marines. Throughout the game, you'd encounter factual skirmishes that involved actual Marines and insurgents that were present at that given moment, based off accounts from those who were actually there. The Marines to your left and your right in those skirmishes were to be the actual Marines — which also meant that those who died in real life would die at the same moment in game. This, as you can imagine, was met with extreme controversy.

The game was being created to honor their fallen service members, but public condemnation proved too great and too universal, so it was dropped within the month by Konami — for very valid reasons.

After the publisher dropped out, the game's director quietly left along with much of studio's staff. The remaining assets were hobbled together to create the the sub-par Breach in attempt to recoup on the time invested in the doomed title. The president of Atomic Games promised that Six Days in Fallujah would eventually see the light of day.

I mean, 'Breach' wasn't terrible, but you could tell there wasn't much heart put into the game.

(QC Games)

Cases can be made for and against the game, but one thing is for certain: it would've offered something vastly different to gamers. In 2009, Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 was released and multiplayer lobbies were filled brim with screaming pre-teens. It was just five years since the Second Battle of Fallujah, which might've been too soon, but it definitely would've been a grim reminder of the true horrors of war in an industry too-often trivialized it.

The gaming community has matured vastly in the last decade. Games like Valiant Heart and This War of Mine have all been based on the realities of war. Games like Arma III and Rainbow Six: Siege have all taken mature, realistic approaches to how modern shooters should play out.

If or when the game does eventually find its footing and a pathway to release, it'll likely find support withing the military-veteran community — as long as the game doesn't, even for a second, make light of the seriousness of the Second Battle of Fallujah.

You know — if it updated its graphics to be comparable with modern games.

(Atomic Games)