MIGHTY TRENDING

A special ops veteran and his Marine dad created History's 'Six'

The son is a USAF Pararescue Jumper and the father is a Vietnam vet and Silver Star recipient.

It's a testament to the everlasting mythology of the SEAL Teams when a screenwriter – who also happens to be an Air Force Pararescue Jumper – and his Marine veteran dad team up to write a TV show about them. That's exactly what happened with History's show Six, now in its second season.

David Broyles is the son of Hollywood (and Vietnam) veteran William Broyles, writer of some of the best military films and television in recent memory, including China Beach, Apollo 13, Jarhead, and Flags of Our Fathers. Now father and son can add Six to that list.

Related: 6 things military veterans will love about History's 'Six'

Before David joined the military, he watched the Twin Towers fall with his father, who was a lieutenant of Marines in Vietnam. He had just finished his degree at the University of Texas at Austin. Within a week, he was looking at joining the military, judging them by their special operations teams.

Yes, he considered joining the Navy to be a SEAL. What he chose was Air Force Pararescue.

David Broyles during his Air Force PJ days.(Courtesy of David Broyles)

"I looked at the SEALs, I looked at the Marine Corps, and I found Pararescue," says David Broyles, co-creator and one of the main writers on Six. "It seemed really challenging with the high washout rate. But also the job was to save lives, so after watching the towers come down I wanted to help. I want to make a difference. And probably like most of us, I wanted to challenge myself."

There were 82 would-be pararescue jumpers in Broyles' initial class. By the time he graduated there were only two (and four more would graduate later). Broyles spent his career in places like Iraq, Afghanistan, Karshi-Khanabad in Uzbekistan. There were good times and there were bad.


"I never felt more alive and never felt more terrified," Broyles says. "The bonds of brotherhood that I experienced have always stuck with me and the things I saw and did have always powered my writing."

Broyles always knew he would be a writer. After the military, he attended Columbia Film School in New York City. When the opportunity came to write Six, it was a chance to express in writing what it all meant to him and his friends that went through the war together.

"It was a way to work through that through writing," he told We Are The Mighty. "A cathartic way to explore it and really honor the guys that were still in there and the guys that didn't come back."

With his father William Broyles, the two wrote the pilot for Six, the elder Broyles bringing his experience in Vietnam while the younger Broyles brought his experience in Iraq and Afghanistan. For Six, however, William Broyles was also bringing his experience as a father who watched his son go off to war.

WIlliam Broyles and his fellow Marines in Vietnam.(Photo courtesy of David Broyles)

William Broyles went off to Vietnam as a youth and didn't really think about how his mother or father felt during his time away. his recent experiences with war put him in just that position. While his son was deployed, William Broyles would go to his cabin in the mountains and not answer the phone. It was a trying time for the families back home.

So while Six highlights the military family in the field, it doesn't forget the family at home that gets left behind.

The father-son duo knew they couldn't please everyone (they acknowledge how hard it is to please the entirety of the military-veteran community) but were determined to zero-in on the emotional truth of those moments of what it meant to serve and to be part of a brotherhood.

And they succeeded.

David's friends and colleagues in the special operations community reached out to him to voice their support and admiration for the show and appreciate his message of what it means to be part of that team.

"I think they respect what we're trying to do," Broyles says "But, it's the toughest group to please. There's no doubt about it. We're constantly straddling the line between reality and drama. We try to straddle the worlds between the hard authenticity, the tactics, the equipment, the movement. We wanted to make it as real and authentic as possible without putting any of the guys who are actually doing the job at risk."

The other side of the coin is telling the story to those who have no experience in war and loss, but making them come to understand what is to be part of that bigger picture.

"That is drilling down to the emotional truth of the moment," he says. "It's not just about war, it's about brotherhood and loss and family. I think people respond to those kind of broader, deeper issues regardless of whether or not you have military experience."

History's Six airs Wednesday nights at 10pm.