MIGHTY SPORTS
Brittany Nelson

These soldiers are headed to the World Championships

The U.S. Army's World Class Athlete Program has three soldier-athletes headed to the Track and Field World Athletics Championships in Doha, Qatar, September 2019.

"It is always amazing and satisfying for coaches and staff to witness soldier-athletes' hard work and perseverance pay off within the WCAP program," said Col. Sean Ryan, WCAP track and field coach.

WCAP, part of the Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation G9 division of U.S. Army Installation Management Command, allows top-ranked soldier-athletes to perform at the international level while also serving their nation in the military.

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Russian weightlifters charged with doping offenses

The International Weightlifting Federation (IWF) says seven more top Russian weightlifters have been suspended and charged with doping offenses, taking this week's total to 12.

The IWF said the seven were Dmitry Lapikov, Chingiz Mogushkov, Adam Maligov, Magomed Abuyev, Maksim Sheiko, Nadezhda Evstyukhina, and Yulia Konovalova. Five of them are world and European medalists.

The seven face allegations stemming from World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) investigations into widespread drug use and cover-ups in Russia over the past decade.

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MIGHTY SPORTS
Julia Savacool

This 7-step box jump workout is the ultimate leg day

What's the difference between a box jump workout and a walk in the park?About 800 calories for every hour you exercise. Box jumps are super tough, no way around it. But they're one of the best leg workouts at the gym that anyone can do. Take them on with regularity and expect strong, sculpted legs, a cardio boost, improved balance and coordination, and fat that seems to disappear overnight.

The intensity of the workout (and stress on your bones) means you probably shouldn't do it more than twice a week. Mix it up with a healthy dose of traditional cardio and strength training to make sure you're working your whole body.

If you're new to box jumps, start by using a low platform — a foot to 18 inches off the ground. Add height as you become more comfortable with the moves, always choosing form first (you'll burn more calories if you do these moves correctly at a lower height as opposed to faking it at a higher one). And no, you don't technically need an official box-jump box to perform box jumps. If you're not at the gym (or your gym doesn't have them), any stable stool or upside-down wooden box will suffice.

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MIGHTY SPORTS
Gary Kunich

Army vet proves doctor wrong by achieving 'the impossible'

Tell her she can't, she'll tell you, "Just watch me."

U.S. Army veteran Twila Adams won the prestigious Spirit of the Games Award at this year's National Veterans Wheelchair Games in Louisville, Kentucky. The award is given to one wheelchair athlete out of hundreds across the nation, Great Britain and Puerto Rico who exemplifies the heart and soul of the Games through leadership, encouragement and a never-give-up attitude.

But that spirit is not just on display at the Games. Adams' positive attitude only got stronger since the 1994 car accident that put her in a chair.

"My parents raised me to believe the impossible, and that's what I've been doing my whole life. Don't tell me I can't. Don't tell me I won't. Tell me what's next and what I have to do, because I'm still here," she said.

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MIGHTY SPORTS
Devon L. Suits

How this soldier pushed himself to the max to make fitness team

Sgt. 1st Class Carlos Zayas wiped the sweat off his brow as he glared at the box on the floor in front of him. Listening to the loud music that echoed throughout the gym, Zayas took a deep breath as he anticipated his next set of exercises.

During a typical high-intensity workout, Zayas would be surrounded by other fitness enthusiasts, but not today. Alone at the Army Warrior Fitness Center, Zayas had one thing motivating him — the clock.

"Training by yourself is OK — you need it sometimes," he said. "However, you always want somebody right next to you to try to beat you in a workout and give you that extra push."

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US Army offers world-class fitness services for soldiers

Are you struggling to meet Army weight standards or need to improve your run time to pass the Army Physical Fitness Test or Army Combat Fitness Test? Maybe you just signed up for the Army Ten-Miler and would like to improve your performance.

Did you know there is a world-class team of experts at an Army Wellness Center near you with access to cutting-edge technology just waiting to help? No need to hire a personal trainer, your AWC offers free services and programs to help you meet your fitness goals.

Last year, AWCs served 60,000 clients and achieved a 97 percent client satisfaction rating, according to the Army Public Health Center's 2018 Health of the Force report. Program evaluations of AWC effectiveness have shown that individuals who participate in at least one follow-up AWC assessment experience improvements in their cardiorespiratory fitness, body fat percentage, body mass index, blood pressure and perceived stress.

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MIGHTY SPORTS
Julia Savacool

5 weight-loss exercises that are backed by science

If you come from a family sporting dad bods, you're more likely to carry extra pounds yourself. Some of that is nurture: You grew up in an environment where people ate more and possibly exercised less. The other part is nature: Some people carry an obesity gene that makes them more likely to be overweight.

If you're one of those people, you might want to select your workouts carefully. A new study of 18,424 Chinese adults by Wan-Yu Lin of National Taiwan University found that certain exercises are more effective than others at encouraging weight loss in people genetically predisposed to obesity.

To arrive at this conclusion, researchers investigated gene-exercise interactions by first evaluating participants on five obesity measures (BMI, body fat percentage, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio). After performing a regression analysis to determine their genetic vulnerability to obesity, researchers reviewed the type of exercise participants engaged in, and compared these findings with the obesity level.

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MIGHTY SPORTS
Julia Savacool

Want a body like Ryan Reynolds? Dream on. But this workout will Help

Anyone can get in movie-star shape. All it requires is working out every day for two to four hours, skipping carbs, hiring trainers, and having a Hollywood studio foot the bill and then pay handsomely for your time. It's how Ryan Reynolds and his superhero peers look the way they do on the big screen. That's not to say their workouts aren't impressive. They're typically the kind of upper-body-heavy exercise routines that only someone who does this for a living could finish. Because of this, they're worth following.

Take the workout that Reynolds was tackling while filming "Deadpool 2." When he enlisted celebrity trainer Don Saladino to create a routine that would build muscle, add definition, and improve overall fitness, he got what he asked for. Saladino designed a variety of circuit-style workouts that covered most major muscle groups with a focus on the upper body. While he didn't report how often he worked out, let's just say he ended up looking like a pretty unrealistic dad of two in the end. Mission accomplished.

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MIGHTY SPORTS
Oriana Pawlyk

No-fail trial PT tests could help improve fitness scores for airmen

The top enlisted leader of the U.S. Air Force is making resiliency a top priority for the last year of his tenure, and part of his plan to promote strong and mindful airmen is to revamp how airmen approach the physical fitness assessment, commonly known as the PT test.

Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Kaleth O. Wright is looking at new ways of approaching the PT test. One possibility under consideration is a no-fail trial PT test, that if passed, would count as the airman's official score, Wright's spokesman, Senior Master Sgt. Harry Kibbe, said.

"The intent is to relieve some of the anxiety, and hopefully this is one of the steps that can get [the Air Force] closer to a culture of fitness rather than a culture of fitness testing," Kibbe told Miliary.com on Aug. 7, 2019. The news was first reported by Air Force Magazine.

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