Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY TRENDING
Alan W. Dowd

How to raise the stakes with Russia and make Putin rethink his meddling

After a chaotic week of unforced errors courtesy of President Donald Trump, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats calmly explained that Russia's efforts "to undermine our basic values," "divide us from our allies," and "wreak havoc with our election process" are "undeniable," grimly concluding: "We're under attack." Noting that "the very pillar…of democracy is the ability to have confidence in your elected officials—that they were elected legitimately," Coats added, "We have to take every effort to ensure that happens in this upcoming election and future elections."

Before discussing some of the efforts the U.S. might take in response to Vladimir Putin's Russia, it's worth recapping what Moscow has been doing.


Using cyber-technologies, social media, and false-front organizations, Russia has carried out strategic-influence operations targeting political-electoral systems in 27 countries, including the U.S., Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Lithuania, Poland and several other NATO allies.

Freedom House reports that Russia has "deepened its interference in elections in established democracies through…theft and publication of the internal documents of mainstream parties and candidates, and the aggressive dissemination of fake news and propaganda." Kristofer Harrison, who worked in the State Department and Defense Department during the administration of President George W. Bush, points to examples at Bloomberg, Reuters, the New York Times and other reputable news organizations.

Donald Trump speaks at a campaign event in Fountain Hills, Arizona, before the March 22, 2016 primary.

(Photo by Gage Skidmore)

Moscow's goal in these actions, according to a U.S. intelligence report, is to "undermine public faith in the U.S. democratic process" and "undermine the U.S.-led liberal democratic order." Moscow may be succeeding.

A plurality of Americans (45 percent) believe Russia leaked hacked material to impact the 2016 election, and 68 percent of Americans express concern that Russia will interfere in future elections. Beyond the U.S., just glance at recent headlines: "Russian hackers are targeting Macron," blares a France24 report. "Russia used Twitter bots and trolls 'to disrupt' Brexit vote," reads a headline from The Times of London. "Merkel warns of Russian cyberattacks in German elections," Deutsche Welle adds.

Add it all up, and both the evidence of Russian interference and the worry regarding future interference serves to undermine democratic institutions all across the West.

In this light, NSC-68, the pivotal national-security document penned in 1950 that provided a roadmap for waging the Cold War, seems strangely relevant. NSC-68 noted that Moscow's "preferred technique is to subvert by infiltration and intimidation," that "every institution of our society is an instrument which it is sought to stultify and turn against our purposes," that institutions "that touch most closely our material and moral strength are obviously the prime targets," that Moscow's objective is to prevent those institutions "from serving our ends and thus to make them sources of confusion in our economy, our culture and our body politic."

Yes, NSC-68 was a response to the communist Soviet Union. However, it pays to recall that post-Soviet, post-communist Russia is led by a former KGB intelligence officer who was trained in the dark arts of disinformation and influence manipulation. His intelligence agencies and cyber-soldiers have triggered a cascade of scandals that are paralyzing our government, sowing confusion and undermining public confidence in our institutions.

Consider: Russia's hacking into U.S. political campaigns, manipulation of social media and use of weaponized leaks first eroded support for the Clinton campaign; then undermined the legitimacy of the Trump administration; and finally, as former CIA official Mark Kelton concludes, helped "advance Putin's over-arching goals of degrading American power, denigrating American ideals, and driving a wedge between President Trump and the U.S. intelligence community."

President Barack Obama's too little, too late and toothless "cut it out" warning to Putin as well as Trump's obsequious echo of Putin's promise that "it's not Russia…I don't see any reason why it would be" have failed to address this threat. Both leaders have overlooked a basic truth in dealing with dictators: All that matters when interacting with Putin, and his kind are actions — theirs and ours. What Churchill said of his Russian counterparts remains true of Putin and his puppets. "There is nothing they admire so much as strength, and there is nothing for which they have less respect than for weakness."

Barack Obama meets with Vladimir Putin outside Moscow, Russia on July 7, 2009.

(Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Here are some pathways policymakers could take to change Putin's calculus and raise the costs of his malign actions.

1. Defend the Homefront against Foreign Intrigue

In his farewell address, Washington warned about the "insidious wiles of foreign influence" and the "mischiefs of foreign intrigue," urging his countrymen "to be constantly awake" to such dangers.

The good news amidst all the troubling news is that key institutions—Congress, federal and state agencies, and the press—have been awakened to the dangers posed by Russia's strategic-influence operations. Day by day, these institutions are exploring and exposing Russian intrusion into the U.S. political system.

Several Senate and House committees are investigating Russia's reach, which is altogether appropriate. But to restore and preserve the integrity of America's institutions, Congress should create a joint committee of seasoned members—with fact-finding and legislative authority—dedicated to a) monitoring, investigating and exposing attempts by Russia and other foreign entities to interfere in the U.S. political-electoral system; b) identifying individuals and entities in the U.S. that collaborate with or work on behalf of hostile governments like Russia; and c) securing necessary, sustained funding to help state and county election agencies shield themselves from foreign intrusion.

That last point highlights the genius of America's decentralized election system. Its highly diffuse nature—with the electoral process governed not by some national agency, but rather by 50 states and 3,141 counties—makes it difficult for a foreign power to manipulate outcomes. Even so, evidence of Russian efforts to penetratelocal election systems and acquire firms that handle voter-registration data are raising flags. Federal resources can help expose these efforts and harden these targets.

2. Take the Fight to Russia

Even as they stand up their new committee—call it the Joint Select Committee on Election Integrity—congressional leaders should reopen the U.S. Information Agency, which was shut down in 1999, after decades of countering Moscow's Cold War propaganda. Former DNI James Clapper proposes "a USIA on steroids to fight this information war a lot more aggressively than we're doing right now."

Former Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper.

Likewise, NATO commander Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti urges Washington to "bring the information aspects of our national power more fully to bear on Russia." He recommends strengthening and unleashing the Russian Information Group (a joint effort of U.S European Command and the State Department) and the State Department's Global Engagement Center (a project charged with countering foreign disinformation).

Further up the ladder, the United States could respond in kind to Putin's assault on the West's political systems. It's not difficult to imagine the U.S. executing a cyber-operation that turns Putin's stage-managed elections into a full-blown farce: returns showing Leonid Brezhnev finishing second or Czar Nicholas II winning a few oblasts or no one at all winning. Putin would get the message.

3. Shore up the Infrastructure

Arguing that democracy "needs cultivating," President Ronald Reagan helped create the National Endowment for Democracy "to foster the infrastructure of democracy."

Similarly, perhaps it's time for the world's foremost groupings of democratic nations—the G-7, European Union, NATO and its partners in Japan, South Korea, New Zealand and Australia—to create a pool of resources to reinforce and rebuild the infrastructure of liberal democracy, monitor and expose Moscow's cyber-siege of the West, and help those countries under information-warfare assault preserve the integrity of their democratic institutions.

4. Deploy Additional Instruments of National Power

Finally, the United States should offer moral support to democracy inside Russia and along Russia's periphery. "A little less détente," as Reagan argued, "and more encouragement to the dissenters might be worth a lot of armored divisions."

Toward that end, Washington should provide a sturdy platform to human-rights activists, journalists and political dissidents from Russia; use high-profile settings to highlight Russia's democracy deficit; and draw attention—relentlessly and repeatedly—to Putin's assaults on human rights, civil society, religious liberty and political pluralism.

To his credit, Trump took this very tack vis-à-vis North Korea during his 2018 State of the Union address. It's time to use the bully pulpit in the same way against Putin. If the president is unable or unwilling to do so, leaders in Congress and at relevant agencies must fill the vacuum, as Coats and FBI Director Christopher Wray recently have.

Hard-power tools can serve as an exclamation point to these words: More defensive weaponry could flow to Ukraine to protect Ukraine's fragile democracy; rotational deployments in the Baltics and Poland could be made permanent to reassure NATO's easternmost members; NATO could stand up an Allied Command-Arctic to checkmate Putin's next landgrab; the U.S. could deploy its vast energy reserves, in Gen. Martin Dempsey's words, "as an instrument of national power" to make Russia's oligarchs feel the consequences of Putin's actions.

Revelations of Russian interference are troubling. But they are also clarifying. In light of its actions, there should be no question as to whether Putin's Russia is a friend, no illusions that Putin can be mollified by promises of "resets" or post-election "flexibility," no doubts about Moscow's motives, no debate over the threat posed by a revisionist Russia.

The task ahead is to fully expose Russia's reach into our political system, strengthen our institutions to harden them against another wave of foreign influence, and defend liberal democracy at home and abroad.

This article originally appeared on Real Clear Defense. Follow @RCDefense on Twitter.