Tech

This cutting edge technology is helping to treat veterans with amputations

For decades, allied forces have deployed to the front lines and suffered heavy losses and sustained lifelong injuries. Although various treatments are available to help restore some functionality to those who've lost limbs, none come close to the exciting new prosthetics emerging today.


Recently, two Army veterans, Fred Downs and Artie McAuley, both of whom lost their left arms more than forty years ago, became the first recipients of new prosthetic arms, called "Life Under Kinetic Evolution," that enable a wide range of natural motions.

 

 

The LUKE arms were developed by the Defense Advanced Reseach Projects Agency (DARPA) and represent the most significant prosthetic advancement in more than a century.

"There are far too many veterans who have paid a heavy price for protecting our freedom," Dr. Justin Sanchez, the Director of DARPA proudly states. "We owe it to these people to give them the best possible technology and clinical care."

These elusive limbs are manufactured by Mobius Bionics, a company created to market the technology developed by DEKA Integrated Solutions Corp.

Related: The Army is really amping up its laser weapon technology

The advanced system allows the recipient to articulate precise activities, like handling delicate fruit, by using wireless signals generated from sensors worn on the patient's feet or other readily accessible areas.

 

 

The technology took years to develop and, with the help of the Department of Veteran's Affair, have finally been cleared by the U.S. Food and Administration.

Also Read: How this flashlight became the most enduring piece of military tech

More than 100 people living with amputations were involved with the initial case studies for the LUKE arm, helping to develop the unique technology.

"I'm loving it, I really am." — Artie McAuley

Check out DARPA's video below to see the epic new technology change veterans' lives for the better.