Widgets Magazine

The military origin of 'turning a blind eye' to something

There's something to be said for aggressively pursuing the job you want. For British Admiral Horatio, Lord Nelson, that opportunity came at the Battle of Copenhagen when the famous admiral disobeyed the orders of a less-famous, less successful one in the funniest way possible.

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The first large crowd to gather after 9/11 will probably not surprise you

The days following the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 were a strange time for Americans. For the first time in most people's lives, political divisions disappeared. Daily life became anything but routine, even if you lived far from Ground Zero. Even American pop culture was deeply affected by the events, unsure of when it would be acceptable to laugh again.

Leave it to America's foremost experts in drama and onscreen conflict to show everyone it was okay to gather once more.

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Veterans

Sergeant Slaughter really was a sergeant of Marines

As if Robert Rudolph Remus wasn't already a badass wrestling name on its own, upon becoming one of the now-WWE's most beloved Superstars, Remus chose the stage name "Sergeant Slaughter." It was appropriate at the time, even wearing his character's trademark Smokey Bear-style campaign hat: Remus was not only a United States Marine, he was also a Drill Instructor.

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These are the 7 rules for fighting a 'just war'

Countries go to war for a lot of reasons these days. Turkey invaded Syria to keep the Kurds from declaring it to be their homeland. The United States and The United Kingdom almost went to war over a pig. Some 2,000 people died in the fighting between two Italian states because someone stole a bucket. While those are all dumb, there are some good reasons to fight a war, and that's what the "Just War" philosophers have been working on forever.

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Why disfigured World War I veterans had their own park benches

It wouldn't do much good for a wounded World War I veteran trying to reintegrate into society to have a passersby gasp in shock and horror every time they saw him. The town of Sidcup in England attempted to ameliorate this shocked, audible response by attempting to warn the locals about the tenants of a nearby soldiers hospital.

Seeing a man on a blue bench when all the other benches in town were a different color warned the locals the image of a man sitting on it might come as a shock – and the veterans were grateful.

WARNING: Some of these images might be disturbing to even modern eyes.

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An O-1 took command at Pearl Harbor and took the fight to the Japanese

Destroyers, in general, don't get as much love as they deserve for their contribution to World War II. The USS Aylwin is not different, even though her crew managed to do what few others could, which was to take the fight to the sucker-punching Japanese Navy and naval air forces during and after its attack on Pearl Harbor.

Despite having only half the necessary crew and being commanded by an Ensign, the Aylwin was out on patrols immediately.

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The crazy pirate plan to bring Napoleon to the United States

On Chartres Street in New Orleans' French Quarter, you can find the best muffuletta sandwich and the best Pimm's Cup cocktail at a place called Napoleon House – so named because it was going to be the residence of L'Empereur – just as soon as the pirates could rescue him from his exile in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.

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How an unarmed F-111 downed an enemy without firing a shot

The F-111 Aardvark didn't have a lot of air-to-air kills – it just wasn't designed to be in aerial combat. It was a supersonic nuclear bomber and recon plane. But a fighter it was not. What it did have was an electronic warfare variant that could help the Air Force control the skies in a particular battlespace. Unlike their combat-ready counterparts, these EF-111A Ravens didn't have defenses if they were attacked in the air.

So when the unarmed variant scored the only aerial kills in the history of the F-111, it was a memorable occasion.

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This is why the most successful fighter pilots in history are all Nazis

When Erich "Bubi" Hartmann died in 1993, he was still the most successful fighter pilot in the history of aerial warfare. With an astonishing 352 kills, his record is all but assured until World War III comes around. He's not the only former Nazi Luftwaffe pilot whose name is at the top of the list. In fact, the top ten pilots on that list all have German names, including Gerhard Barkhorn (301 kills), Günther Rall (275), and Otto Kittel (267).

How did one of the most notably absent air forces in history rack up such impressive kill counts?

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