MIGHTY TACTICAL
Oriana Pawlyk

Air Force successfully flies hypersonic missile on B-52 bomber

The U.S. Air Force just flew its first test flight of the AGM-183A Air Launched Rapid Response Weapon, a hypersonic weapon Lockheed Martin says it will continue to ground and flight test over the next three years.

The weapon, known as ARRW (pronounced "Arrow"), flew on a B-52 Stratofortress bomber aircraft on June 12, 2019, at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The tests were aimed to gather data on "drag and vibration impact" to the weapon as well as the performance of the carriage bay on the aircraft, the service said. The Air Force released photos of the flight via Twitter on June 18, 2019.

As part of a rapid prototyping scheme, the Air Force has been working with Lockheed, the prime contractor, to develop the hypersonic tech that would move five times the speed of sound as the Pentagon races to win the global race for new hypersonic technologies.

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MIGHTY TACTICAL
Oriana Pawlyk

KC-46 debuts at Paris air show amid news of more delays

The Air Force's new KC-46 Pegasus tanker landed on the flight line at France's Paris-Le Bourget Airport June 15, 2019, ahead of its public debut at the air show.

But the overseas unveiling comes on the heels of a new government watchdog report outlining new concerns for the KC-46 program, and amid continued challenges with manufacturer Boeing Co. regarding assembly line inspection.

Dr. Will Roper, assistant secretary of the Air Force for acquisition, technology and logistics, said it will take some time for the new inspection process to become standard at Boeing's production facility. The inspections are supposed to correct actions that set back the program earlier this year.

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MIGHTY CULTURE
Oriana Pawlyk

This C-17 crew broke diplomatic protocol to save a life

Air Force Capt. Forrest "Cal" Lampela was about to put the aircraft landing gear down in Shannon, Ireland, eight hours into a flight. If all had gone according to plan, he and his C-17 Globemaster III crew should have been more than halfway over the Atlantic.

He couldn't see the runway because of dense fog, catching a glimpse of it from only 100 feet above the ground — the absolute minimum altitude to which the large transport aircraft can descend before its pilot must either call for a landing or to abort approach.

Somewhere below, an ambulance stood by, waiting to pick up a sailor who had been wounded in combat and was in critical condition.

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MIGHTY TRENDING
Jim Absher

VA may now approve civilian urgent care facilities for veterans

Got a sore throat or a sprained ankle and don't want to go to a Department of Veterans Affairs hospital? Got sick at 8:00 on a Friday night and don't want to wait until Monday to see a VA doctor? A new VA program may be for you.

As of June 6, 2019, the VA offers medical care to eligible veterans at selected civilian urgent care facilities nationwide.

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MIGHTY TRENDING
Oriana Pawlyk

Space Force to include National Guard

The U.S. Space Force will incorporate National Guard units that already have a space-related mission, according to the head of Air Force Space Command.

"We rely very heavily on the Air National Guard and the Air Force Reserve forces, and that's going to continue in the future," said Air Force Gen. John "Jay" Raymond during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee to become the new head of U.S. Space Command.

"They operate really critical capabilities. They provide a capacity, a resource capacity, and we're going to rely on them. They're seamlessly integrated," he said June 4, 2019.

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MIGHTY TRENDING
Richard Sisk

Pentagon report says it takes almost a year of waiting to be buried at Arlington

Military families can wait up to 49 weeks for burials of loved ones at Arlington National Cemetery (ANC) because of the high demand for graveside ceremonies and the increasing mortality rates of older veterans, according to a Pentagon Inspector General's report.

The system in place for scheduling and conducting burials is suited to the task, the IG's report states, but the sheer volume of family requests routinely exceeds "the resources available on a daily basis for the conduct of burials," including honor guards and chapel availability.

In addition, the advanced age of veterans from World War II, Korea and Vietnam leads to more requests for burials than can be handled on a daily basis, states the IG's report, released in May 2019.

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MIGHTY CULTURE
Richard Sisk

Petition for Fort Hood 'Hug Lady' goes viral

For 12 years, she was there for Fort Hood, Texas, troops going to and coming from deployments to combat zones with her engaging smile, words of comfort and, always, that great big hug — maybe a half million of them.

Now, an online petition has been started requesting the Defense Department to rename the place that served as her second home — the Fort Hood Arrival/Departure Airfield Control Group terminal (A/DACG) — for Elizabeth Corrine Laird, aka the "Hug Lady."

The petition, launched May 25, 2019, on the Change.org for-profit petition platform, had gathered more than 63,000 signatures through mid-morning May 30, 2019.

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MIGHTY TRENDING
Oriana Pawlyk

Thunderbird hits bird during Air Force Academy graduation

A U.S. Air Force Thunderbird opted to depart early and land after apparently hitting a bird following May 30, 2019's Air Force Academy graduation flyover, according to the team spokesman.

"The Thunderbirds Delta [formation] safely executed the flyover, when [Thunderbird No. 3] experienced a possible birdstrike," Maj. Ray Geoffroy, spokesman for the demonstration team, based at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, said in a statement. "Out of an abundance of caution, he returned to the base and landed without incident prior to the aerial demonstration portion of today's performance."

The team typically returns after the flyover to perform an aerobatic demonstration for the event, Geoffroy said. The Thunderbirds fly the F-16 Fighting Falcon.

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MIGHTY SPORTS
Gina Harkins

Navy ditches sit-ups and adds rowing for new PT test

Sailors who have long pushed for Navy leaders to come up with a better way to measure abdominal strength will finally get their way.

Sit-ups will be axed from the Navy's physical readiness test starting in 2020, the service's top officer announced on May 29, 2019. Sailors can expect planks and rowing tests to replace the event on the annual assessment.

"We're going to eliminate the sit-ups," Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson said in a video message announcing the changes. "Those have been shown to do more harm than good. They're not a really good test of your core strength."

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