Articles

This physicist changed the face of science before he was killed by a sniper during World War I

Great thinkers through history have written for centuries that there is nothing more wasteful of potential talent than war. Young men and women who might have gone on to do great things are mowed down senselessly in wartime, and what we may have gained is forever lost to speculation. Few embody this more than Henry Moseley, a physicist killed by a sniper at the age of 27 during World War I.

Keep reading... Show less
Articles

This naval battle helped set the stage for two world wars

Keep reading... Show less
Articles

Are military bands a thing of the past?

Music in the military has a long history.

Keep reading... Show less
Articles

This is the only time since the War of 1812 that enemy forces occupied US soil

Keep reading... Show less
Articles

Here's how the 'Bloody Angle' turned into the worst fighting of the Civil War

Keep reading... Show less
Articles

Here are 3 early attempts at automatic weapons

The search for an effective rapid-fire weapon, particularly in the latter 19th century, took on some innovative designs, most of them of dubious battlefield utility and rarely employed. All this changed when the U.S. Army adopted the famed Gatling gun in 1866, which could reliably fire up to 400 rounds a minute and had already proven itself in small quantities during the Civil War. John Gatling -- ironically a physician -- had suddenly made warfare far more deadly.

Keep reading... Show less

Here's the amazing story of the famed "Flying Tigers"

Keep reading... Show less
Articles

How the sinking of Germany's greatest battleship proved the value of naval aviation

Keep reading... Show less
Articles

Here's the most influential US general you never heard of

Depiction of the Battle of Monterrey in September 1846 during the Mexican-American War. (Image date: ca. March 2, 1847.)

Keep reading... Show less